Landmark Links November 4th – Who’s On First?

funny-baseball-player-falling-picture

Lead Story…. It seems like nearly everyone in the real estate industry likes to use the baseball analogy to describe the real estate cycle.  There’s a little known rule that every home builder/developer conference has to have a panel where participants are asked what inning the current cycle is in by a moderator.  I suppose that this was considered either novel or informative at some point but today it’s neither.  The problem is that it’s difficult to classify real estate, especially real estate development in such broad and generalized terms.   Whenever I’m asked such a question, I answer the same way: what asset class and what market?  Another important clarification is the time frame of the recovery that began the cycle in question.  Most people consider our current cycle to have begun in June of 2009 which was when the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) marked the end of the last recession.  However, when it comes to home building and by extension the economy as a whole, it’s not that simple as Bloomberg’s Conor Sen wrote this week (emphasis mine):

The National Bureau of Economic Research marked the end of the last recession at June 2009. Similarly, the stock market hit bottom in the first half of 2009. The four-week moving average of initial jobless claims peaked in April that year. And the unemployment rate peaked in October. All of these suggest a broad-based trough at some point during 2009, making the economic expansion at least seven years old by now.

But given the severity of the financial crisis and the shock to the economy, the beginning of the recovery was not like moving from recession to expansion. It was more like moving from depression to recession. Rather than a normal business cycle in which four steps forward are followed by two steps back, the Great Recession was more like five steps back. Should the ensuing first two or three steps count as part of the next expansion, or something else?

The growth in the early part of this recovery was abnormal. Part of it was caused by government fiscal stimulus, which proved to be inadequate and was then followed by federal, state and local austerity. Part of it was caused by a “dead cat bounce,” as output fell so hard, below consumption in industries like the auto sector, that a certain amount of recovery was inevitable as producers had to increase output merely to match consumption. And then some part of the recovery was caused by the energy sector and the boom in fracking, a localized boom that eventually went bust.

So what went missing in those first few years of “recovery”?  The answer is home building which is the reason that I think much of the current cycle’s math is a bit off.  More from Sen (emphasis mine):

The missing piece was housing, the bread and butter of the American economy. The Housing Market Index from the National Association of Home Builders didn’t begin to increase from depressed levels until October 2011. Similarly, single-family-building permits didn’t begin to increase from depressed levels until 2011. It’s here, in late 2011, that I would claim the current expansion began, making it barely five years old, quite young in the context of a downturn that lasted four or five years rather than just two.

Ultimately, housing is the driver of the U.S. economy, which is why any understanding of the recovery of the economy must factor in the recovery of housing. Single-family-building permits peaked in the second half of 2005. Subprime mortgage originators started going bankrupt in 2007, the same time that housing prices started falling significantly. Outside of globally attractive real estate markets like San Francisco, New York and Miami, housing prices and activity continued to fall well into 2011.

The early years of the housing recovery, from 2010 to 2012, were more driven by investors and institutions buying foreclosures and investment properties with cash than by owner-occupiers coming back to the market. In the past few years, housing demand has been soaking up inventory created during the bubble years and pushing home prices back toward their mid-2000s levels. First-time home-buying remains below normal.

Only now are we seeing tertiary markets like exurban areas start to expand again, and construction remains below the level of household formation. One of the metro areas that was a poster child of the housing bubble, the Riverside-San Bernardino metro area in Southern California, is still building 80 percent fewer single family homes than it was at the peak of the last cycle.

That last highlighted section is something that I’ve written about frequently.  Although LA, Orange County and San Diego get a lot of attention for their great weather, beautiful beaches and affluent communities, it’s actually the Inland Empire that is the engine of growth in Southern California.  Especially when it comes to creating new housing for first time buyers and blue-collar workers that can’t afford to live closer to the coast.  That this region is still building 80% fewer units than it was at the peak of the last cycle is nothing short of shocking.  IMHO, it can’t be classified as much of a recovery at all.  As Sen points out in his article, every economic sector doesn’t necessarily recover in unison.  Just because tech has boomed or energy has boomed then busted doesn’t mean that other sectors are doing the same.  When it comes to a traditional growth sector like housing, this can have a massive impact on a regional (or even national) economy.  For some traditional growth markets like the Inland Empire, perhaps the appropriate question isn’t what inning of the cycle we are in but rather when the recovery will actually begin in the first place.

Economy

Even Keeled: Calculated Risk’s Bill McBride is still not on recession watch.

Setting the Stage: The Fed didn’t raise rates at their November meeting but certainly indicated that they are open to doing so in December.  See Also: The Fed’s latest statement indicates that they are not going to target inflation rates above 2%.

Commercial

Going Strong: Chinese investment in US commercial real estate is still on the rise.

Residential

Put a Lid on It: Low FHA limits are killing home building in California’s secondary markets.

Imagine That: San Francisco home sales surged in September thanks to a large supply of newly-completed condos.

The Oracle of Home Building? Berkshire Hathaway just purchased the largest home builder in Kansas City.  It’s the just the latest purchase for Warren Buffett who has been buying up builders in the south and Midwest.

Profiles

Ain’t No Free Lunch (Or Shipping): Why the free shipping that you love so much from online retailers is mostly a lie.

Shocker: This years Black Friday deals will probably be exactly the same as last year’s Black Friday deals.

Subprime Redux: Rising automobile repossessions show the dark side of the car buying boom.

SMH: The University of California at Irvine, which is in Landmark’s back yard wants to be the Duke basketball of online gaming (aka video games).  Ok, fine but can they please stop calling it a “sport”?

Chart of the Day

ie-permits

WTF

Hero: A woman sustained burns after causing a fire by farting during a surgery, igniting a laser.  Pain is temporary but glory lasts forever.  See Also: Ten people who were arrested for farting.

Guaranteed Contract: Former NBA star and certified crazy person Gilbert Arenas just received the final check from the $111MM contract that he signed in 2008. If you’re not familiar with Arenas, he once got into a locker room altercation with a teammate that involved a firearm and hadn’t played in the NBA in nearly 5 years. Great investment. (h/t Tom Farrell)

That’s Going to Leave a Mark: A drunk 28-year old Florida man fell out of his pickup truck on the way home from a strip club and immediately ran his leg over before it crashed into a house.  He’s apparently still at large.

Landmark Links – A candid look at the economy, real estate, and other things sometimes related.

Visit us at Landmarkcapitaladvisors.com

Landmark Links November 4th – Who’s On First?

Landmark Links July 26th – Nip and Tuck

michael-jackson-before_and_after

Lead Story… Home renovations, which are already near record highs, are projected to accelerate over the coming year according to a new report by the Harvard Joint Center For Housing titled Above Average Gains in Home Renovation and Repair Spending Expected to Continue.  The study estimates that growth in the home improvement and repair space will reach 8.0% by the beginning of 2017, well in excess of it’s 4.9% historical average.  From the Joint Center’s press release:

“A healthier housing market, with rising house prices and increased sales activity, should translate into bigger gains for remodeling this year and next,” says Chris Herbert, Managing Director of the Joint Center. “As more homeowners are enticed to list their properties, we can expect increased remodeling and repair in preparation for sales, coupled with spending by the new owners who are looking to customize their homes to fit their needs.”

“By the middle of next year, the national remodeling market should be very close to a full recovery from its worst downturn on record,” says Abbe Will, Research Analyst in the Remodeling Futures Program at the Joint Center. “Annual spending is set to reach $321 billion by then, which after adjusting for inflation is just shy of the previous peak set in 2006 before the housing crash.”

Housing sales do indeed spur renovation activity, but there is something else at play here not referenced in the study that we seem to be witnessing a lot of lately: a market with increasing prices, little move-up inventory and low sales will lead to renovations as well.  It’s been well documented that the number of move-up homes on the market has been shrinking, meaning that those who wish to trade up out of an entry-level home have few options that are often bid up to high sale prices.  Calculated Risk’s Distressing Gap chart helps to explain this: new home sales are still extremely subdued (although recovering lately) and existing home sales are still well off their prior peak despite a growing population.

In most markets, if you are an owner of an older, entry level home and you want to upgrade, there are currently few options despite the fact that you may be sitting on a large amount of equity as prices have appreciated.  At the same time, debt yields have plummeted, sending mortgage rates plunging to record lows.  So what do you do?  Tap into some of that home equity to fix up your existing home (and, for Californians maintain a low property tax basis).  This is a potentially-self-perpetuating cycle where starter homes get upgraded and people stay put longer, meaning that new construction is being relied upon for an ever-higher percentage of entry level supply.  However, it becomes particularly daunting to build new homes at an entry level price point when approximately 24.3% of the final sale price of a new home is attributable to regulation.  “We could see percentage growth rates in the remodeling and home- improvement sector that exceed those for new home construction in the next few years,” according to Brad Hunter, chief economist with HomeAdvisor, an online home services marketplace.  Great news if you own stock in Home Depot, Lowe’s, Masco, etc or own a home in an aging neighborhood where this is going on but I’m not as convinced as the Joint Center authors are that it will necessarily lead to higher sale volume.

Economy

Still Bright: Despite all of the noise and bold print headlines, Bill McBride of Calculated Risk still doesn’t see an impending recession.

Yellow Light: JBREC sees Baby Boomer retirement keeping a lid on US economic growth through 2025.

Flattening: Renters (at least those at the high end), are starting to get some relief from ever-rising rents as inventory grows.  This could lead to lower inflation, making it more difficult for the Fed to hike rates.  See Also: Yellen still waiting for overwhelming evidence to warrant a rate hike.

Commercial

Feeding Frenzy: Restaurants, not shops, are  increasingly becoming the driving force behind retail centers in the US. See Also: As e-commerce continues to hit retailer margins, the mall of the future will offer dinner, movies….and a colonoscopy.

Crowding Out: Vancouver’s port is facing a potential crisis as the local housing boom continues to encroach onto former industrial sites leaving operators with few options for warehouse space.

Residential

Telecommuting: The boom in co-working space, combined with insane home prices and rents in the Bay Area has made telecommuting from low-priced rust belt cities a reality for some former Bay Area tech workers.

Roadblock: Construction labor unions are  throwing a hissy fit and fighting Governor Jerry Brown’s plan to make it easier to build more housing in California because he has thus far refused to make a massive union handout part of the deal.

Sale of the Century: It’s apparently a great time to buy a mansion in the Hamptons as the market has cooled with sales down around 60% from last year……if you have around $10MM or so to burn.

Profiles

Dinosaurs: Believe it or not, VCR’s are still being produced in Japan but won’t be after this month.

The Juice is Loose: David Ortiz aka Big Papi of the Red Sox who was washed up a couple of years ago, hit a home run so hard that it got stuck in Pesky’s Pole, because steroids.

Chart of the Day

High Building Costs Make it Tough to Construct Affordable Homes

WTF

Lazy Shit: For those of you who don’t like to lift a finger to do much of anything, there is now an app called Pooper that allows you to summon someone to pick your dog’s poop up off the sidewalk or your neighbor’s lawn.  Don’t laugh, it was valued at $850MM in it’s latest funding round.

That Escalated Quickly: In-store video footage captured a man attempting to build a chemical weapon in a California Walmart.  See Also: Five weird crimes that could only happen in a Walmart.

Tenement: Members of Australia’s Olympic team refused to move into Rio De Janeiro’s Athlete’s Olympic Village over safety concerns and issues with plumbing.  Rio’s mayor responded by offering to get them a kangaroo in order to help them feel more at home to which an Aussie team spokesperson replied: “we do not need kangaroos, we need plumbers to account for the many puddles found in the apartments.”  This has the potential to be a huge mess.

Landmark Links – A candid look at the economy, real estate, and other things sometimes related.

Visit us at Landmarkcapitaladvisors.com

Landmark Links July 26th – Nip and Tuck

Landmark Links July 5th – Oh Baby

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Quick Programming Note: Expect a much shorter blog this week and possibly next as well. I’m about to drive to the hospital with Mrs. Links to do our part in contributing to the economic tailwind known as positive demographics.  This will be our second little girl and since the first one I’ve become acutely aware that my ability to write a semi-coherent sentence is inversely proportionate to the number of diapers I’ve changed and hours of sleep deprivation that I’ve experienced in a 24-hour period.

Lead Story: Last week I posted a demographics post from Calculated Risk about how we are in the early innings of a very positive demographic cycle that should be great for the home building industry as well as the US economy as a whole:

Ben Carlson of A Wealth of Common Sense wrote a follow-up blog post that summarized the impact of a demographic cycle where large numbers of people are entering their 3rd decade of life perfectly:

Based on personal experience and what I’ve seen from my peers, here’s what happens when most people start hitting their 30s these days:

  • You move out of the mega-city to the suburbs or a more affordable city so you can actually afford a house and have a normal standard of living.
  • You buy a house and you end up spending a ton of money on things you never would have expected to buy just a few years earlier — more furniture, decorations, tools, lawn care, property taxes, maintenance, stainless steel appliances, remodeling, countertops, cabinets and the list could go on forever. You can basically add $20,000-$30,000 to the estimated amount you think you’ll pay for a house $5,000-$10,000 to every estimate for renovations to your house. And houses these days are bigger and nicer than ever before.
  • Then you have kids and kids are not cheap. That means spending money on diapers, car seats, strollers, clothes, toys, daycare (basically a second monthly mortgage payment), classes, sports, camps, parties, etc. The latest estimates peg the amount to raise a child to age 18 at anywhere from $176,000 to $407,000. Maybe you end up spending a little less on yourself, but you have to expect to spend more money when you have children.
  • With kids come SUVs or minivans because you’re going to need a new car or two to carry all of that stuff that you’ve been buying for your kids everywhere. Good luck taking an Uber when you have to fill your trunk with baby supplies and use car seats for every trip you make out of the house.

Growing up is expensive. It’s like a rite of passage to spend money on these things.

Not every millennial will take this traditional route, but more will do so than most people now assume. As people get older they want different things. You can’t act or live like a 20 year old forever.

Please read the whole thing here as I think it’s well worth your while.  It’s easy to be pessimistic for a host of reasons.  However, despite current economic issues there are a lot of positive developments beginning to take shape…if you’re able to look to the long term.

Economy

Going Down: Brexit concerns have driven treasury yields towards new lows.

Upward Trajectory: College-educated workers now dominate the American workforce as never before.

Commercial

Takeover: How Amazon swallowed downtown Seattle.

High Vacancy: Take a tour inside China’s largest ghost town.

Residential

Bizarro World: Only in the perverse world of California NIMBYs could a new development with 11,000sf lots be considered “high density.”

Status Update: The US housing market in 9 charts.

Big Winners? US home owners could be the big winners in the Brexit drama due to falling mortgage rates.

Profiles

Groundhog Day: It’s the first week of July which means that the NY Mets just paid Bobby Bonilla, who hasn’t played since 2001 $1.9MM just as they will continue to do until 2033 because, Bernie Madoff.

Water, Water Everywhere…. New research finds that California actually has plenty of groundwater, it’s just really, really far below the surface and extremely difficult to get to.

Chart of the Day

Ummmmmm……

WTF

Drunkorexia: College kids are eating less and working out so that they can get wasted quicker.  These are the same people demanding safe spaces on campuses where they can be free from anything that might offend them.

Well Thought Out: A man tried to rob a Kentucky Chuck E Cheese while on a job interview.  No word if he used his real name on his application.  Let me use this as an opportunity to remind you that Chuck E Cheese is a veritable cesspool of crime and deviance.

Darwin Award Nominee: A German tourist at Peru’s historic Machu Picchu died last week when he fell off a cliff while taking a selfie (h/t Winn Galloway).

Landmark Links – A candid look at the economy, real estate, and other things sometimes related.

Visit us at Landmarkcapitaladvisors.com

Landmark Links July 5th – Oh Baby