Landmark Links October 11th – Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is

USP NFL: CLEVELAND BROWNS AT BUFFALO BILLS S FBN USA NY

Lead Story… As I wrote a couple of weeks ago, the Obama Administration took the unprecedented action of calling on cities and counties to re-think their zoning laws.   This was a concerted effort to increase affordability and fight back against NIMBY’s who have successfully stopped development in some of America’s most productive cities.  The proposal is bold in that governors don’t often involve themselves in land use issues, let alone a sitting president.  However, the toolkit presented by the Administration is somewhat toothless because cities are ultimately still ultimately free to do as they please and they ultimately have control over local land use policy.

An additional way to achieve more density is actually quite straight forward: cash.  If the Federal Government really wants denser, more walkable mixed use development then they need to incentivize it by amending FHA rules that currently make it very difficult to build product that fits that description.  From The Washington Post (emphasis mine):

Main Street-style development — the “storefront on the first floor, apartments rented out above” style that forms the core of any older town’s historic center — is a residential building form that uses first-floor commercial space to serve community members and enliven a neighborhood. This low-rise density helps prop up the balance sheets of towns responsible for running utilities all the way out to suburban developments, as former city planner and engineer Charles Marohn has repeatedly demonstrated. It also keeps a constant set of the “eyes on the street” that Jane Jacobs identified as necessary for safe streets; renters keep an ear out for burglars after business hours and shopkeepers keep the same at bay during the day. It is, in other words, the core of any successful town-building.

Yet for 80 years, Main Street development has been effectively driven from the market by the growth of federal housing policy hostile to mixed use. Ever since Herbert Hoover’s Commerce Department helped promote the spread of model zoning codes that physically separated people and their community institutions, the federal government has poured its energy and resources into encouraging the growth of widely dispersed single-family homes and large, centralized tower blocks. To this day, FHA standards for loans, which set the market for the entire private banking sector, prohibit any but the most minimal commercial property from being included in residential development. As a groundbreaking report by New York City’s Regional Plan Association found, these standards are “effectively disallowing most buildings with six stories or less.” And depending on the program, a building could have to reach to 17 stories before it is eligible for participation in the normal housing markets. Without the FHA’s blessing, projects are granted the “nonconforming” kiss of death unless their developers can persuade a local bank to write an entirely customized loan for them, one whose risk the bank would have to keep entirely on its own books.

These caps on commercial space and income should be raised to level the playing field for housing development and let small developers invest as much in their home towns as huge corporations will in big cities. Caps currently limited to 15 and 25 percent should be raised to more than 35 percent to legalize even just three- and four-story buildings. As small towns and secondary cities across the country seek to revitalize their downtowns to become more competitive job markets, unreformed financing restrictions act as an invisible barrier, suffocating local efforts to invest in smaller communities. And while the housing affordability crisis has reached the most acute levels in a handful of coastal cities like New York, San Francisco and Washington, the White House admits that “this problem is now being felt in smaller cities and non-coastal locations.”

The current financing restrictions make it so that the tail frequently wags the dog in mixed use residential construction.  Cities often want ground floor retail to be included to add to their tax base and  increase walkability but it’s incredibly difficult to finance.  Instead what happens, is the developer gets stuck trying to thread the needle between building just enough retail to appease the city but keeping it at a low enough percentage of the total project square footage to avoid the dreaded non-conforming label.  The end result is that functional retail space is sacrificed in order to comply with FHA rules.  So, rather than having a well-designed retail concept, you end up with small, non-functional retail components in all but the largest projects.  The space has little actual economic value except as a means to obtain financing.  By way of example, a project one block from our office was recently denied by Newport Beach’s city council due to a lack of ground floor retail.  No doubt that the developer was designing to the financing constraints but didn’t include enough retail to get the City on board.  The federal government took a step in the right direction earlier in the year by making it easier to finance condos.  This is the next logical step if they are serious about increasing density and making housing more affordable.  Time to put your money where your mouth is.

Economy

Meh: The September Jobs Report was sort of a dud.

Here to Stay?  I love this explanation from Bloomberg’s Noah Smith on why low interest rates don’t necessarily cause excessive risk taking:

What is it that allows rates to hover around zero indefinitely without causing investors to do bad things with cheap money? It depends on why rates are low in the first place. If money is cheap because central banks are using their powers to keep rates lower than what the market would bear on its own, it stands to reason that investors will take cheap money and invest it in riskier things than they otherwise would. But if rates are low because of natural forces in the economy, and central banks actually have little to do with it, then there’s no reason business people would be taking extra risk.

Crude Math: An agreed OPEC production cut has oil back above $50/barrel but large, recently discovered reserves are likely to create yet another glut in the not-too-distant future.

Commercial

Over the Hump?  Apartment rents fell for the first time in a very long time in the 3rd quarter.

Dumpster Fire: Bottom tier retailers Kmart and Sears are technically still in business but both stores are utter disasters.  Rating agencies just put Sears Holdings, the company that owns both on death watch and the only way that it’s keeping the lights on is by selling the best assets that it owns.  Part of the problem is that Sears Holdings still own or lease approximately 2,500 properties so this mess will be very difficult and time consuming to wind down.

Sears-map

Residential

Beneficiaries: Vancouver’s home sales are down 33% after they introduced a foreign buyer tax.  Seattle is likely to benefit.  See Also: New York is overtaking London as the #1 destination for international property investment thanks to Brexit.

White Knight?  Tech firms, often considered villains when it comes to housing issues in the Bay Area are now throwing their weight behind pro-development groups to push for more housing construction.  See Also: The housing shortage is going to start negatively impacting economic growth in California more seriously if something isn’t done.

NIMBY Awards: The Bay Area Metropolitan Observer put together a list of their top 10 Bay Area NIMBY moments of 2016.  It would be funnier if it wasn’t so sad.

Profiles

Payday: Everyone’s favorite sexting app, also known as Snapchat is working on an IPO rumored to value the tech firm at $25 billion.

GTL is Cancelled: Tougher regulations and taxes are hitting tanning salons hard and there are 30% less of them than there were in 2008.

Chart of the Day

NIMBYs gone wild: LA Edition

Greg Morrow Capacity Graph

Source: Greg Morrow of UCLA

WTF

Best Excuse Ever: A Canadian pole vaulter who tested positive for cocaine just days before the Rio Olympics and nearly didn’t get to attend claimed that it happened because he made out with a girl that he met on Craigslist.

Wings (and Heads), Beer, Sports: Green Bay Packers tight end Jared Cook ordered some food at Buffalo Wild Wings and received a deep fried chicken head on his plate.

People of Walmart: Walmart was selling a shirt on it’s website that said: “I’d Rather Be Snorting Cocaine off a Hooker’s Ass.”  Sadly, it was taken down once management realized what was going on.

Bad Idea: Entering a Florida Walmart is a bad idea in the best of times.  Doing it before a major hurricane when people are stocking up is just asking for trouble as you’ll see in the video of the day.

Landmark Links – A candid look at the economy, real estate, and other things sometimes related.

Visit us at Landmarkcapitaladvisors.com

Landmark Links October 11th – Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is

Landmark Links September 2nd – Clueless

golden retriever

Lead Story… On Tuesday, I posted a piece about how construction unions actively undermined a measure that CA Governor Jerry Brown had presented to help solve California’s affordable housing crisis by making it easier to gain approval for residential projects that would provide a certain number of affordable units.  I have limited time to write today’s blog post but I want to revisit that story, which the WSJ reported on (they wrote about a similar proposal in NY as well that was nuked by the unions) because the utter absurdity of it is so mind boggling (highlights are mine):

For both measures, construction unions were key to the defeat, as they won over key allies with their argument that the government shouldn’t be aiding apartment development without also guaranteeing union-level wages. Unions, particularly in New York, have been facing a gradual erosion of their market share on residential developments, and now developers that a generation ago would have been union shops are able to fill jobs with nonunion workers, which can lower construction costs by an estimated 20%, according to New York-based Citizens Housing and Planning Council, a low-income housing group.

Robbie Hunter, president of the State Building and Construction Trades Council of California, said policies like the one pushed by Mr. Brown should allow construction workers to make a decent living “rather than drive those workers into the need of affordable housing itself.”

Allow me to clarify: the reason that the unions killed both deals was that NY and CA wouldn’t stipulate that all projects that fell under the proposals be built by union workers at a so called “prevailing wage” which is really just a fancy way of saying overpaying.  Notice in the passage highlighted above that the unions have lost market share in recent years.  I wonder why.  Could it possibly be that residential projects (especially in CA with it’s high impact fees) typically aren’t viable at “prevailing wage” standards?  Often, in residential developments, the only time that you see union labor being used are when a union pension fund provides the equity behind the project.  Otherwise we just don’t see it that often because numbers simply don’t work.  By the way, when a union pension fund provides the equity, they almost always have to take a substantially lower return in order to subsidize the above market “prevailing” wages paid for construction.

The real story here should be that unions are facing declining market share because they refuse to adapt.  Governor Brown’s proposal would have undoubtedly created more construction jobs in California, leading to more demand for labor and higher wages.  If construction labor unions were at all flexible in their compensation demands, many of those jobs could have gone to union  workers.  However, rather than trying to expand their ranks, which ironically would lead to more power, not less, construction unions have dug in their heels in an effort to preserve the unsustainable wage structure of existing members.  The rest of us pay the price since a proposal that would have provided a starting point for dealing with CA’s growing housing crisis is now toast.  Looks like the status quo of runaway housing cost wins again.

Economy

Looking Up: Federal income tax withholding data indicates that both wages and economic growth are on the rise.

(Skilled) Help Wanted: As skill requirements increase, more and more manufacturing jobs are going unfilled.

Commercial

Rise of the Machines: How CoStar is using spy planes to get an edge in tracking new development for rent projections.

Evolving: Some malls are starting to look a bit like theme parks as landlords try to cope with high vacancy from traditional tenants.

Residential

Closed for Business: Message to tech firms from Palo Alto’s anti-jobs mayor: go away.  See Also: Formerly middle class Palo Alto has gotten so expensive that not even techies can afford to live there anymore.  For example, someone is listing a 790sf studio for $1.3MM.  Turns out that the housing bubble of the aughts really didn’t mean much at all in Palo Alto:

Proof is in the Pudding: The next time someone tells you that adding units, including luxury ones to the housing stock doesn’t help affordability, direct them to these:

Exhibit A: Manhattan condo developers are offering discounts, concessions and perks in an effort to keep sales robust in the midst of a glut.

Exhibit B: How Brooklyn’s luxury apartment boom is turning into a rental glut.

Profiles

Hero: 40 years ago John Bogle of Vanguard was sick of Wall Street overcharging for shitty performance.  He did something about it and started the first index funds despite ridicule from his peers.  Today, index funds hold nearly $5 trillion in low fee assets while much higher fee investments languish. 

Hot Item: How the premium Yeti Cooler, also known as a “Redneck Rolex” became a prime target for thieves.

Get Off My Lawn: Baseball’s fan demographics keep getting older, raising the question: can a game with a 19th-century tempo survive in the age of instant gratification?

Chart of the Day

WTF

Funny, In a Sad Sort of Way: Rapper Tyga got his leased Ferrari repossessed while he was at the dealership shopping for a new Bentley.

In Soviet Russia… Vladimir Putin was arrested at a Florida grocery store on trespassing charges, because Florida. 

Seems Like a Reasonable Response: A Pennsylvania woman was arrested for biting her husband and stabbing him with scissors after she caught him drinking her beer.

Again, Seems Reasonable: Meet the father who destroyed his daughter’s car with heavy construction equipment after catching her in it with a boy.

Landmark Links – A candid look at the economy, real estate, and other things sometimes related.

Visit us at Landmarkcapitaladvisors.com

Landmark Links September 2nd – Clueless

Landmark Links August 30th – Size Matters

Eggplant

Lead Story…  New homes have been getting larger for quite some time, since the end of the Great Recession to be exact.  Conventional wisdom had held that the size of homes would shrink after the Great Recession due to more focus on affordability and reduced financial capacity of buyers.  However, except for a brief blip in 2009 where new homes shrunk, it didn’t happen.  Instead, mortgage credit shut off for all but the most qualified buyers (read: wealthier) which pushed builders to focus on higher-end, larger homes where mortgage financing was available rather than smaller, entry level homes where mortgage financing was scarce.  This led to much hand wringing among urbanists and others that McMansions, which, in addition to being ugly are often bad investments would continue to be a dominant feature of the suburban American landscape.  The starter home market has been slow at best (McMansions make crappy starter homes for a whole bunch of reasons) and many astute housing market observers have noted that we need to see decreasing new home sizes in order for that market to emerge from it’s slump.  Fast forward to 2016 and it might finally be happening.  From CNBC:

For the first time since the recession, home size is shrinking. Median single-family square floor area fell from the first to the second quarter of this year by 73 feet, according to the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and U.S. Census data. That may not sound like a lot, but it is a clear reversal in the trend of builders focusing on the higher-end buyer.

An increase in home size post-recession is normal, historically, as credit tightens and more wealthy buyers with more cash and better credit, rule the market. As with everything else in this unique housing cycle, however, the trend this time is more profound.

“This pattern was exacerbated during the current business cycle due to market weakness among first-time homebuyers,” wrote Robert Dietz, NAHB’s chief economist. “But the recent small declines in size indicate that this part of the cycle has ended and size should trend lower as builders add more entry-level homes into inventory.”

Sales of newly built homes jumped more than 12 percent in July compared to June, according to the Census, and the biggest increase was in homes priced in the mid to just below midrange. The median price of a new home sold in July fell 1 percent compared to July a year ago. Again, not a huge drop, but a reversal from the recent gains in new home prices.

“The majority of it is a question of affordability,” said Bob Youngentob, president of Maryland-based EYA, a builder concentrating largely in urban townhomes. “People want to stay in closer-in locations, at least from our experience, and closer-in locations tend to be more expensive from a land and development standpoint and so, the desire to be able to keep people in those locations is translating into smaller square footages and more efficient designs.”

This is undoubtedly a positive development in the market so long as the trend holds.  What makes it even more significant is that the internals or the numbers behind the size reduction are also very positive.  First off, new homes are getting smaller at a time when new home sales have risen to a level not seen since 2007, confirming that this isn’t a trend based on weak sales volume or diminished starts in select geographies that favor smaller units.  Second, home prices fell, albeit only by 1%.  Often times, falling prices are viewed as a negative.  However, in this case, they should be viewed positively since, along with shrinking new home size and increased new home sales, they imply that product mix is moving in a more affordable direction.  Size matters and the shrinkage that new homes are experiencing could be the best news for the US housing market in quite some time.

Economy

Much Ado About Nothing: This far, experts’ dire claims about economic calamity following the Brexit haven’t amounted to much at all in the real world.

Bottom Rising: Low paying industries are seeing the fastest wage growth in the US which has positive implications for everything from consumer spending to housing.  See Also: Laid off American workers are having a better go of it than they had been over the past few years.

Staying Away: The Fed’s dislike of negative interest rates is likely to make them an observer of the controversial monetary policy rather than an implementer.

Commercial

Cookie Cutter: How over regulation led to the ugliest feature of most American cities and towns – the strip mall.

LA’s New Skyline: How Chinese developers are transforming downtown LA, just as they did in cities in China.

Residential

Alternate Universe: Only in the bizarro-world of California land use politics would construction labor unions undermine a bill that would have created substantially more construction employment opportunities.

Dumbfounded: Suburban NIMBYs oppose any and all development then act puzzled about why Millennials don’t want to move to their communities.

Profiles

Consider The Source: How Jose Canseco went from baseball’s steroids king/whistle blower to Twitter’s favorite financial analyst.

There Goes the Neighborhood: There is a new startup in Silicon Valley called Legalist that relies on an algorithm to predict court cases and will fund your business-tort lawsuit in exchange for a portion of the judgement.

Worth Every Penny: In honor of National Dog Day last week, here is a breakdown of just how much we spend on our four-legged best friends.

Chart of the Day

Mom’s basement is a really popular address in New Jersey

Source: Curbed

WTF

No I Will Not Make Out With You: A Mexican teen died from a blood clot that resulted from a hickey that his girlfriend gave him.

Bad News: A new study finds that reading on the toilet is bad for you.  Just like that, my reading location for much of Landmark Links’ content became an occupational hazard.

Priorities: An 18 year old girl who escaped from an Australian correctional facility messaged police via Facebook to ask them to use a better picture of her than the mug shot that they posted.  She even provided a picture that she wanted them to use.  Of course, police were then able to track her phone and arrested her soon after.

Video of the Day: A video taped melee on a NY subway that resulted from a crazy woman getting on a packed subway with a bucket full of hundreds of crickets and worms that she was trying to sell made me laugh so hard that I cried. And yes, I’m aware that this probably makes me a terrible person.

Landmark Links – A candid look at the economy, real estate, and other things sometimes related.

Visit us at Landmarkcapitaladvisors.com

Landmark Links August 30th – Size Matters

Landmark Links August 26th – Transition

Bruce JennerLead Story… Two particularly troublesome issues in the US real estate market are the need for more affordable housing and figuring out what to do with vacant malls and other underutilized retail sites.  The Westminster Arcade in Providence Rhode Island, the oldest mall in the US offers an interesting solution: converting un-used portions of malls to micro apartments:

As more people turn to the internet to buy what they need, shopping malls across the country are closing their doors. But one historic mall has found a creative way to re-purpose its former retail space: America’s first shopping mall, the Westminster Arcade in Providence, Rhode Island, has now been turned into micro lofts, offering people the chance to truly live inside a piece of history.

The Westminster Arcade opened in 1892, introducing the English-style indoor shopping experience to the United States. But in recent years, like so many other retail locations across the U.S., the mall had fallen on hard times. Despite undergoing a renovation, the space ultimately closed its doors in 2008 due to economic reasons.

But instead of being demolished, developers decided to give the mall a second life. The first floor is still being rented out as commercial space, but the top two floors have been turned into micro apartments. And the 38 units, which range in size from 225 to 300 square feet, are designed to accommodate the growing masses cramming into Rhode Island’s urban areas.

So far, residents are generally young professionals who don’t have much stuff, and so don’t mind living in such cramped quarters. Rent starts at $550 a month, and there’s already a waiting list of those eager to move into the “cozy” spaces.

This seems like an efficient way to kill two birds with one stone.  It’s relatively cost effective to build out the residential units since the structure is already there and just needs to be converted in order to transition to mixed use (I’m assuming that there are some issues with plumbing capacity so it may not work everywhere), meaning that rents can be on the low side for smaller units.  This is where the demand is anyway at a time when most new multi-family projects are expensive luxury product.  In addition, the upper-floor renters provide foot traffic to sustain the ground floor retail that now doesn’t need to rely on department stores.  To take it a step further, the department store spaces can be re-purposed for medical uses – which would fit perfectly if the apartment units were targeted towards seniors – or self storage which would be in high demand for residents of micro-units.  On the surface, it seems like a win-win.  Anyone out there have any thoughts as to why this wouldn’t work?

Economy

Still Holding Up: Despite some hiccups,  the underlying trend shows people are getting jobs, earning more money, and then spending some of those funds, meaning that the economy is still headed in the right direction.

Dirty Secret: There’s one part of central banking that central bankers often don’t like to talk about – their inflation targets are completely arbitrary.

The Old Fashion Way: How to get and stay rich in Europe – inherit money for 700 years.

Residential

Facepalm: The mayor of Palo Alto would prefer to see less job growth rather than more housing in order to “solve” his city’s housing crisis.  I guess when you buy a house for $490k in 1994 and it’s now worth $4mm, it’s difficult to see past the economic self interest in keeping housing scarce.

Rebuttal: I was going to write a rebuttal to the piece that I posted on Tuesday about the non-NIMBY argument for restrictive zoning but ran out of time.  Preston Cooper at Economics 21 did a better job than I would have anyway.  Long story short, it eventually results in the country looking like something moderately resembling The Hunger Games.

Imagine That: The 15% foreign buyer tax in Vancouver that we have posted about previously is already throwing ice water all over the already-cooling housing market there.  See Also: The white hot Seattle market is showing some early signs of cooling a bit. (h/t Scott Cameron)

Priorities: Apartment hunters are increasingly selecting units based on convenience for a very important family member: the dog.  As a self-professed crazy dog person I totally relate to this.

Profiles

Valuable Commodity: The fascinating story of how Instant Ramen Noodles overtook tobacco to become the black market currency of choice in America’s prisons (hint – the food there is really, really bad and getting worse).

Color Coordination: Great Britain decided that it was a good idea to give all of their Olympic athletes identical red suitcases which led to a hysterical epic FAIL upon their return to Heathrow after the closing ceremonies.

LOL: Looks like someone may have leaked the top secret recipe for KFC’s fried chicken.

Chart of the Day

Consider this your daily reminder that houses in CA are incredibly expensive

WTF

Friday Quiz: See if you can figure out whether or not some really arcane sports were ever actually in the Olympics.

Darwin Award Attempt: If you feel the need to jump from rooftop to rooftop to impress your date than you probably shouldn’t be dating.

Fight!  Watch a group of women beat the crap out of each other in a Chicago Walmart.

Landmark Links – A candid look at the economy, real estate, and other things sometimes related.

Visit us at Landmarkcapitaladvisors.com

Landmark Links August 26th – Transition

Landmark Links August 23rd – Blind Sided

pool push

Animated photo in wordpress.com link (trust me, it’s worth it)

Lead Story… A massive number of Home Equity Lines of Credit (also known as HELOCs) were originated from 2005-2007, many of which have not been refinanced due to a combination of increased underwriting scrutiny and falling values (depending, of course on where the home is located).  Nearly all of these loans were revolving lines with adjustable rates that are interest only for the first 10 years.  Now those loans are beginning to convert to amortizing which is leading to an increase in missed payments and a whole bunch of headachese.  From the WSJ:

The bill is coming due for many homeowners on a type of loan that was widely popular in the run-up to the housing bust, causing a rise in delinquencies at banks.

More homeowners are missing payments on their home-equity lines of credit, or HELOCs, a type of loan that allows borrowers to withdraw cash from their house to pay for renovations, college tuition or almost any other expense. These loans typically require interest-only payments for the first 10 years, but then principal payments kick in for the next 15 or 20 years.

The increased cost of the loan can become a strain for some borrowers. This is becoming an issue now because many borrowers signed up for Helocs in the run-up to the housing bust as home values kept rising. Roughly 840,000 Helocs taken out in 2006 are resetting this year, with principal payments on an additional nearly one million loans expected to hit in 2017.

Borrowers who signed up for Helocs in early 2006 were at least 30 days late on $2.8 billion of balances four months after principal payments kicked in this year, according to Equifax. That represents 4.4% of the balances on outstanding 2006 Helocs. Delinquencies were at 2.9% before the reset.

Resets can lead to payments jumping by hundreds, or in some cases, thousands of dollars a month. Consider a Heloc with a $100,000 balance and a 4.5% interest rate. It would have a $375 interest-only monthly payment, which would then rise to about $633 when principal payments kick in, assuming a 20-year repayment period, according to mortgage-data firm HSH.com.

Consider this part of the lasting hangover from the Great Housing Crisis.  Banks, the government and borrowers spent a lot of effort in working through issues arising in the massive primary mortgage market both during and after the Great Recession but spent almost no time on HELOC’s.  This made sense as the primary market is far larger than the HELOC market and represented a much larger systemic risk.  Also, as stated earlier, almost all HELOC’s are adjustable meaning that borrowers generally benefited from falling interest rates over the past 10 years or so even if the loans couldn’t refinance.  Many borrowers who thought that they were mostly out of the woods are now getting blindsided by letters from their HELOC lender informing them that the payment is about to increase because it’s about to start amortizing.  Those with significant equity (mostly in the expensive coastal markets that have recovered the most) will probably refinance.  Those who don’t have significant equity are either going to have to absorb the higher payment, sell or try to work out a deal with their lender (who probably doesn’t want to foreclose and assume responsibility for the 1st DOT being that there is little to no equity and the HELOC itself might be underwater).  This is probably not a catastrophe in the making since it’s nowhere near the size of the primary mortgage market and inventory is generally tight to begin with.  However, it is another headwind in a housing market (and an economy for that matter) that is finally showing tepid signs of a real recovery.

Economy

New Normal: Federal Reserve officials are begrudgingly coming to the conclusion that they have long feared – the unconventional tools that they have had to use during and after the Great Recession are likely to be needed for a long time.

About Time: Middle-income jobs are finally showing signs of a rebound.

Resilient: A handfull of shale drillers are ramping up drilling in the oil patch again as prices close in on $50/barrel.

Commercial

The Beneficiaries of Hoarding: Self storage has been white hot and could be for some time, benefiting from declining home ownership, new management systems and better technology. (h/t Scott Ramser)

Residential

On the Move: The non-NIMBY argument for restrictive zoning in big coastal cities.  Not sure how this plays out in the real world but it’s sort of fascinating.  See Also: Bay Area startups find low cost outposts in Arizona.

Expensive Affordability: For the first time ever, Seattle is mandating that apartment and condo developers include affordable units in their projects or pay an in-lieu fee to develop affordable units elsewhere after a unanamous City Council vote. (h/t Scott Cameron)

Profiles

Dual Threat: Say what you will about Kobe Bryant’s final few crappy seasons with the Lakers but the guy seems to have an eye for good VC investments.

Swipe Right: Single people are starting to use Linked as a dating site.

Maverick: The story of how Mark Cuban went from a broke 20-something nicknamed “Slobbins” who knew nothing about computers and lived in a 2 bedroom apartment with 5 other guys to a billionaire is inspiring.

Chart of the Day

Things you need are getting more expensive while things that you want are getting cheaper.

prices2-1

WTF

Striptease: Two Mongolian wrestling coaches protested the outcome of an Olympic bronze medal match by stripping down to their underwear in a packed arena.

Hell NO: KFC is now selling a sunblock that makes you smell like a basket of fried chicken. They sold out right away because no one ever went broke betting against the taste of the American public.

Side Effects: You can’t overdose on marijuana but it might make you call your cat a bitch (and land you in the paper if your wife calls 911 and it’s a particularly slow news day).  (h/t Trevor Albrecht)

Landmark Links – A candid look at the economy, real estate, and other things sometimes related.

Visit us at Landmarkcapitaladvisors.com

Landmark Links August 23rd – Blind Sided

Landmark Links July 5th – Oh Baby

daddy-gasmask.jpg

Quick Programming Note: Expect a much shorter blog this week and possibly next as well. I’m about to drive to the hospital with Mrs. Links to do our part in contributing to the economic tailwind known as positive demographics.  This will be our second little girl and since the first one I’ve become acutely aware that my ability to write a semi-coherent sentence is inversely proportionate to the number of diapers I’ve changed and hours of sleep deprivation that I’ve experienced in a 24-hour period.

Lead Story: Last week I posted a demographics post from Calculated Risk about how we are in the early innings of a very positive demographic cycle that should be great for the home building industry as well as the US economy as a whole:

Ben Carlson of A Wealth of Common Sense wrote a follow-up blog post that summarized the impact of a demographic cycle where large numbers of people are entering their 3rd decade of life perfectly:

Based on personal experience and what I’ve seen from my peers, here’s what happens when most people start hitting their 30s these days:

  • You move out of the mega-city to the suburbs or a more affordable city so you can actually afford a house and have a normal standard of living.
  • You buy a house and you end up spending a ton of money on things you never would have expected to buy just a few years earlier — more furniture, decorations, tools, lawn care, property taxes, maintenance, stainless steel appliances, remodeling, countertops, cabinets and the list could go on forever. You can basically add $20,000-$30,000 to the estimated amount you think you’ll pay for a house $5,000-$10,000 to every estimate for renovations to your house. And houses these days are bigger and nicer than ever before.
  • Then you have kids and kids are not cheap. That means spending money on diapers, car seats, strollers, clothes, toys, daycare (basically a second monthly mortgage payment), classes, sports, camps, parties, etc. The latest estimates peg the amount to raise a child to age 18 at anywhere from $176,000 to $407,000. Maybe you end up spending a little less on yourself, but you have to expect to spend more money when you have children.
  • With kids come SUVs or minivans because you’re going to need a new car or two to carry all of that stuff that you’ve been buying for your kids everywhere. Good luck taking an Uber when you have to fill your trunk with baby supplies and use car seats for every trip you make out of the house.

Growing up is expensive. It’s like a rite of passage to spend money on these things.

Not every millennial will take this traditional route, but more will do so than most people now assume. As people get older they want different things. You can’t act or live like a 20 year old forever.

Please read the whole thing here as I think it’s well worth your while.  It’s easy to be pessimistic for a host of reasons.  However, despite current economic issues there are a lot of positive developments beginning to take shape…if you’re able to look to the long term.

Economy

Going Down: Brexit concerns have driven treasury yields towards new lows.

Upward Trajectory: College-educated workers now dominate the American workforce as never before.

Commercial

Takeover: How Amazon swallowed downtown Seattle.

High Vacancy: Take a tour inside China’s largest ghost town.

Residential

Bizarro World: Only in the perverse world of California NIMBYs could a new development with 11,000sf lots be considered “high density.”

Status Update: The US housing market in 9 charts.

Big Winners? US home owners could be the big winners in the Brexit drama due to falling mortgage rates.

Profiles

Groundhog Day: It’s the first week of July which means that the NY Mets just paid Bobby Bonilla, who hasn’t played since 2001 $1.9MM just as they will continue to do until 2033 because, Bernie Madoff.

Water, Water Everywhere…. New research finds that California actually has plenty of groundwater, it’s just really, really far below the surface and extremely difficult to get to.

Chart of the Day

Ummmmmm……

WTF

Drunkorexia: College kids are eating less and working out so that they can get wasted quicker.  These are the same people demanding safe spaces on campuses where they can be free from anything that might offend them.

Well Thought Out: A man tried to rob a Kentucky Chuck E Cheese while on a job interview.  No word if he used his real name on his application.  Let me use this as an opportunity to remind you that Chuck E Cheese is a veritable cesspool of crime and deviance.

Darwin Award Nominee: A German tourist at Peru’s historic Machu Picchu died last week when he fell off a cliff while taking a selfie (h/t Winn Galloway).

Landmark Links – A candid look at the economy, real estate, and other things sometimes related.

Visit us at Landmarkcapitaladvisors.com

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