Landmark Links July 26th – Nip and Tuck

michael-jackson-before_and_after

Lead Story… Home renovations, which are already near record highs, are projected to accelerate over the coming year according to a new report by the Harvard Joint Center For Housing titled Above Average Gains in Home Renovation and Repair Spending Expected to Continue.  The study estimates that growth in the home improvement and repair space will reach 8.0% by the beginning of 2017, well in excess of it’s 4.9% historical average.  From the Joint Center’s press release:

“A healthier housing market, with rising house prices and increased sales activity, should translate into bigger gains for remodeling this year and next,” says Chris Herbert, Managing Director of the Joint Center. “As more homeowners are enticed to list their properties, we can expect increased remodeling and repair in preparation for sales, coupled with spending by the new owners who are looking to customize their homes to fit their needs.”

“By the middle of next year, the national remodeling market should be very close to a full recovery from its worst downturn on record,” says Abbe Will, Research Analyst in the Remodeling Futures Program at the Joint Center. “Annual spending is set to reach $321 billion by then, which after adjusting for inflation is just shy of the previous peak set in 2006 before the housing crash.”

Housing sales do indeed spur renovation activity, but there is something else at play here not referenced in the study that we seem to be witnessing a lot of lately: a market with increasing prices, little move-up inventory and low sales will lead to renovations as well.  It’s been well documented that the number of move-up homes on the market has been shrinking, meaning that those who wish to trade up out of an entry-level home have few options that are often bid up to high sale prices.  Calculated Risk’s Distressing Gap chart helps to explain this: new home sales are still extremely subdued (although recovering lately) and existing home sales are still well off their prior peak despite a growing population.

In most markets, if you are an owner of an older, entry level home and you want to upgrade, there are currently few options despite the fact that you may be sitting on a large amount of equity as prices have appreciated.  At the same time, debt yields have plummeted, sending mortgage rates plunging to record lows.  So what do you do?  Tap into some of that home equity to fix up your existing home (and, for Californians maintain a low property tax basis).  This is a potentially-self-perpetuating cycle where starter homes get upgraded and people stay put longer, meaning that new construction is being relied upon for an ever-higher percentage of entry level supply.  However, it becomes particularly daunting to build new homes at an entry level price point when approximately 24.3% of the final sale price of a new home is attributable to regulation.  “We could see percentage growth rates in the remodeling and home- improvement sector that exceed those for new home construction in the next few years,” according to Brad Hunter, chief economist with HomeAdvisor, an online home services marketplace.  Great news if you own stock in Home Depot, Lowe’s, Masco, etc or own a home in an aging neighborhood where this is going on but I’m not as convinced as the Joint Center authors are that it will necessarily lead to higher sale volume.

Economy

Still Bright: Despite all of the noise and bold print headlines, Bill McBride of Calculated Risk still doesn’t see an impending recession.

Yellow Light: JBREC sees Baby Boomer retirement keeping a lid on US economic growth through 2025.

Flattening: Renters (at least those at the high end), are starting to get some relief from ever-rising rents as inventory grows.  This could lead to lower inflation, making it more difficult for the Fed to hike rates.  See Also: Yellen still waiting for overwhelming evidence to warrant a rate hike.

Commercial

Feeding Frenzy: Restaurants, not shops, are  increasingly becoming the driving force behind retail centers in the US. See Also: As e-commerce continues to hit retailer margins, the mall of the future will offer dinner, movies….and a colonoscopy.

Crowding Out: Vancouver’s port is facing a potential crisis as the local housing boom continues to encroach onto former industrial sites leaving operators with few options for warehouse space.

Residential

Telecommuting: The boom in co-working space, combined with insane home prices and rents in the Bay Area has made telecommuting from low-priced rust belt cities a reality for some former Bay Area tech workers.

Roadblock: Construction labor unions are  throwing a hissy fit and fighting Governor Jerry Brown’s plan to make it easier to build more housing in California because he has thus far refused to make a massive union handout part of the deal.

Sale of the Century: It’s apparently a great time to buy a mansion in the Hamptons as the market has cooled with sales down around 60% from last year……if you have around $10MM or so to burn.

Profiles

Dinosaurs: Believe it or not, VCR’s are still being produced in Japan but won’t be after this month.

The Juice is Loose: David Ortiz aka Big Papi of the Red Sox who was washed up a couple of years ago, hit a home run so hard that it got stuck in Pesky’s Pole, because steroids.

Chart of the Day

High Building Costs Make it Tough to Construct Affordable Homes

WTF

Lazy Shit: For those of you who don’t like to lift a finger to do much of anything, there is now an app called Pooper that allows you to summon someone to pick your dog’s poop up off the sidewalk or your neighbor’s lawn.  Don’t laugh, it was valued at $850MM in it’s latest funding round.

That Escalated Quickly: In-store video footage captured a man attempting to build a chemical weapon in a California Walmart.  See Also: Five weird crimes that could only happen in a Walmart.

Tenement: Members of Australia’s Olympic team refused to move into Rio De Janeiro’s Athlete’s Olympic Village over safety concerns and issues with plumbing.  Rio’s mayor responded by offering to get them a kangaroo in order to help them feel more at home to which an Aussie team spokesperson replied: “we do not need kangaroos, we need plumbers to account for the many puddles found in the apartments.”  This has the potential to be a huge mess.

Landmark Links – A candid look at the economy, real estate, and other things sometimes related.

Visit us at Landmarkcapitaladvisors.com

Landmark Links July 26th – Nip and Tuck

Landmark Links July 1st – East Coast Edition

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Happy 4th of July!  First off, Jason Pierre-Paul of my beloved Giants and his disturbingly-mangled hand has a public service announcement for you: don’t light fireworks off in your hands as doing so can leave you disfigured and also cost you tens of millions of dollars in the NFL free agent market.  To paraphrase Apu from the Simpsons: “Celebrate the independence of your nation by blowing up a small part of it….just make sure that it doesn’t include your hand.”

Lead Story… The Panama Canal will be opening up a new lane for larger ships in the coming weeks.  One of the economic winners will be owners of industrial buildings in a quaint area of South Carolina 200 miles from the sea where a construction boom is underway to accommodate goods coming into the Port of Charleston, which is currently undergoing dredging that will make it the deepest harbor on the east coast.  Consider it the new Inland Empire of the South.  From the Wall Street Journal:

In the past few years, the rolling hills and farmland surrounding Greenville and Spartanburg have given way to massive warehouses and industrial parks. Restaurants in Greenville, S.C.’s formerly neglected downtown cater to corporate managers and engineers from Germany and Japan. Trucks clog the two main interstates, carrying engine parts and finished goods to and from the region’s growing number of manufacturing plants.

More development is on the way: over six million square feet of warehouse space is under construction in the Greenville-Spartanburg region, a scale typically seen in major cities like Philadelphia and St. Louis, according to CBRE Inc., a real-estate brokerage.

The construction frenzy is being fueled by developments at the Panama Canal, nearly 2,000 miles away. The new, wider ship channel will allow bigger ships to pass through, lowering the cost of bringing Asian-made goods directly to the East Coast.

Industrial boom

Sound familiar?  It should if you’eve ever spent time in the former cow pastures west of I-15 in San Bernardino and Riverside Counties that now have millions of square feet of class-A warehouses that serve as a massive distribution hub for the ports of LA and Long Beach.  Some are arguing that the canal widening will allow Asian exporters to hedge against the labor issues that have boiled over in LA and Long Beach in recent years, grinding commerce to a halt even at the expense of a few extra shipping days to get to market.  The counter argument is that days to market will still rule and there isn’t likely to be much of any drop off in LA and Long Beach.  Either way, the net volume of traffic going to east coast ports is likely going up to some extent and that is what industrial developers are anticipating.  This could potentially be a massive economic stimulus for an area that was formerly a textile hub and lately had best been know for automotive manufacturing. More from the Journal:

The expanded Panama Canal “is going to drive industry and create even more businesses there,” said Joel Sutherland, director of the Supply Chain Management Institute at the University of San Diego. “Having a regular flow of containers…will attract major manufacturing, then their suppliers, then their suppliers’ suppliers, and ultimately more people.”

From the Port of Charleston—which is dredging its harbor to be the deepest on the East Coast—container cargo makes the quick trip by rail to a freight hub in Greer, S.C., known as the Upstate’s “inland port.”

Trucks pick up those containers of component parts and retail goods bound for nearby factories and distribution centers. And from there, truckers can reach Atlanta or Charlotte, N.C., in two or three hours, and most of the rest of the Eastern U.S. within a day’s drive.

“The Panama Canal is not even completed, the port dredging has not been completed, but we’re already attracting major distribution and manufacturing companies,” said Trey Pennington, an industrial real-estate broker with CBRE in Greenville. “The Panama Canal will fundamentally change the market dynamics of South Carolina in the coming years.”

It’s also a given that more economic growth and well-paying jobs will lead to more residential and retail development which leads to…..you guessed it – NIMBYs who, as always are coming out of the woodwork to protest anything new being built:

In downtown Greenville, higher-end residential and retail development—a Brooks Brothers clothing shop opened on Main Street in 2013—is forcing out some longtime residents. Across Greenville and Spartanburg counties, residents say traffic congestion has never been worse.

The Upstate’s main roads are lined with razed fields where warehouse structures rise in various states of construction. Conservationists say the region’s natural landscape in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains—which draws outdoor enthusiasts and an especially large number of professional and amateur cyclists—is under threat as housing and industrial construction push further out from the cities and transportation corridors.

“The Upstate needs to balance this development with protecting valuable green spaces and water quality,” said Andrea Cooper, director of Upstate Forever, an environmental advocacy group.

In a strange way, I’m relieved to see that the “If You Build It They Will Whine (and most likely sue you)” crowd doesn’t confine itself to coastal California.  If the Panama Canal expansion ends up resulting in a 10% – 20% increase in goods going through Charleston as some predict, the Upstate could be in for a prolonged economic boom that will likely keep the anti-growth NIMBY crowd busy for the foreseeable future.  If that scenario does play out, look for the region to become a prime growth corridor with all of the positives (and yes, some negatives) that go with economic expansion.  South Carolina may be getting it’s own version of the 909 so be on the lookout for the flat brimmed hats, barbed wire tattoos and lifted pickup trucks.

Economy

Stick a Fork in It: The futures markets are now saying that the Fed won’t raise interest rates until 2018 post-Brexit.  See Also: Government bonds from developed economies have been this year’s jackpot investment.

News Flash: It’s really, really expensive to raise a child in the US.  Per the US department of agriculture, the average cost to raise a child born in 2013 from birth to 18-years old is $245,340, ranging from $176,550 for low-income families to $407,820 for high-income families.   This only covers a kid to age 18 so it DOESN’T include college.  It’s truly a wonder that young people are delaying household formation coming out of the Great Recession…..

Commercial

Scarcity: 1031 exchange buyers are having a difficult time finding enough deals to trade into, leading them into unfamiliar markets and product types and helping to bid up already-high commercial real estate prices.

Residential

Unintended Consequences: There has been no group of people more wrong over the past 7 years than the “interest rates have nowhere to go but up” crowd.  The Brexit is just the latest example of why this line of thinking has been incorrect. There is also a credible argument that Brexit could set off a chain of events that would result in mortgage rates in the 2s.  I’m not saying that it will happen or even that it’s likely but the possibility shouldn’t be ignored based on the deflationary forces that we are seeing in the world economy.

Not in the Ballpark: US housing supply continues to lag far behind demand just as it has been doing since 2009.

Unsustainable: Inflation-adjusted rents rose 64% from 1960-2014 while real household incomes increased only 18%, resulting in the share of cost-burdened renters nationwide exploding from 24% in 1960 to 49% in 2014.  If you want to know why so many people struggle to save for a down payment, this is a good place to start:

Profiles

Hero: Meet the world’s first robot lawyer, a free online chatbot who has managed to overturn 160,000 parking tickets in London and New York, saving users nearly $3.9MM in fines since it was launched 21 months ago.  The 19 year old British coder who invented this should win a Nobel Prize.

Predictable: There is one industry that is about to make a fortune on the Brexit regardless of what happens with regards to markets and the economy: lawyers.

Stressed: The Federal Reserve’s annual bank stress tests have spawned a multibillion-dollar industry where banks hire consultants to manage other consultants  in order to help them pass, fueling a never-ending feedback loop of red tape and bureaucracy.

Chart of the Day.

Supply and Demand for Housing

Supply = Blue, Demand = Gold

Difference Between Housing Supply and Demand

WTF

Breast in the World: Just in time for July 4th, the Journal of Female Health Sciences recently released a new study that found the US rules the world in a very important category: American women have the world’s largest boobs.  The study excluded surgical enhancements, which of course naturally meant that only two women in Orange County – which qualifies as a very different type of Silicon Valley – were eligible to participate.  Yes, this is blatant click-bait but I’m going to milk it for all it’s worth as I feel it’s my duty to augment your base of knowledge by keeping you abreast of important news.

Video of the Day: In a development that will likely alter the path of human history, some genius figured out that beer pong is more fun and challenging if the cups are placed on top of a Roomba vacuum cleaner which is then placed on top of the beer pong table.  Bring a Roomba to your 4th of July BBQ and you will be the most popular person there.  Guaranteed.

Vegan News Roundup: Vegans are now forcing their bat-shit-crazy religion on their dogs (which, by the way are carnivores) because vegans are mostly insane.  Side note: this definitely qualifies as animal abuse.

Landmark Links – A candid look at the economy, real estate, and other things sometimes related.

Visit us at Landmarkcapitaladvisors.com

Landmark Links July 1st – East Coast Edition