Landmark Links November 18th – Hiding in Plain Sight

hiding

Lead Story….  There are two types of correct forecasts.  The first type is the broken clock forecast.  It consists of someone predicting the same thing over and over again, and being mostly wrong and occasionally correct.  Nobel laureate Paul Samuelson’s “The stock market has forecast nine of the last five recessions” quote comes to mind as do all of the folks that have been telling us that “interest rates have nowhere to go but up” since 2009. Taking advice from anyone who makes these types of predictions is useless at best and possibly detrimental.  The second type of prediction is data based and not subject to the author’s biases.  There are very few people who can pull this sort of clear minded analysis off.  Bill McBride of Calculated Risk comes to mind as does reigning bond king Jeff Gundlach of DoubleLine Capital.  Today I want to focus on Gundlach who has correctly predicted every presidential election result since 1972.  What made this year unique even by Gundlach’s standards is that he predicted that:

  1. Trump would win the election back in January BEFORE the presidential primaries even began.
  2. The 10-Year Treasury would yield over 2% by year end back in January when Treasuries yielded a paltry 1.35%.

Today, I want to focus on Gundlach and why he got both of these forecasts right when so many others were incorrect.  Robert Huebscher of Advisor Perspectives published a post earlier this week called How Gundlach Predicted Trump’s Victory  I’m going to post it in it’s entirety today since it contains a lot of terrific insight on Gundlach’s methodology as well as some valuable commentary about where we are headed next:

How Gundlach Predicted Trump’s Victory

Hillary Clinton was a uniquely bad candidate, he said, because of her failure to beat President Obama in 2008, followed by her problems with the email server and a “basic lack of honesty.”

Why did Trump win? Gundlach said that people felt abandoned by the economy, with the median worker having suffered low or negative wage growth since 1973. This came while the top 5% realized a 51% real increase in their purchasing power. He said that the corresponding increase for the top .01% was so large it would have “blown the scale” of his graph.

“The ownership of wealth has shifted,” Gundlach said. “But those trends are about to reverse.” Gundlach said that wealth inequality will decrease.

A big contributor to Clinton’s defeat was the release of the Obamacare data on November 1, Gundlach said, which showed a “massive” increase in premiums. He said that those responsible for scheduling that release must have expected a great piece of news, not the negative “shock” it actually delivered.

Gundlach commented on what the election result means for the markets and specifically how investors should position their bond portfolios.

The markets are confused

“The markets remain completely confused as to what will be the trend direction from the election,” he said.

As evidence of that confusion, he said he was struck by the many pundits who called for a crash and global depression following Trump’s victory; many of them, Gundlach said, now claim Trump is great for stocks.

Trump does not have a “magic wand” to offer instantaneous improvement for the economy, Gundlach said. Investors should expect a bumpy ride while Trump strives to deliver on his promises, he said.

Gundlach has been warning against a rise in interest rates. He turned negative in July, when the 10-year bond was yielding 1.35%; it is now just over 2%.

An interest rate rise will not be positive for the economy or the housing market, he said. Monthly mortgage payments are already up 15%, he said, and could go up 20-25% relative to their mid-year levels. Median rents have been “skyrocketing” and renters have had a “horrible decade,” Gundlach said; those benefits in the housing market have accrued to homeowners.

“That is not positive for the psyche of the middle class,” he said.

Nor will Trump’s victory be positive for consumer spending in the short term, according to Gundlach. Trump’s supporters are not economically in a position to spend.

Gundlach warned against overanalyzing the effects of Trump’s ascendency. Since 1988, the same institutions have been in place, he said, with politics dominated by the Bushes, Clintons and Obama. “The trends of the past 28 years cannot be relied upon,” he said.

Gundlach was emphatic about one group of stocks. He said to “avoid the FANGs in a big way” – Facebook, Amazon, Netflix and Google. “It is not a good idea to bet on ideas whose trends are correlated to things that won’t continue,” he said, especially since the market had priced a Clinton victory into the prices of those stocks. Instead, he said to overweight financials, materials and industrials “for the quarters to come.”

Silicon Valley put a lot of money behind Clinton, he said. The irony is that Trump would have lost if not for Twitter, according to Gundlach.

“The people who hate Trump the most were responsible for his winning the election,” he said.

The recession and inflation forecast

Gundlach said the probability of a recession has increased based on his indicator, which measures the unemployment rate relative to its historical moving average. But he did not say a recession is imminent.

He was more focused on the prospects for higher inflation.

Inflation measures, including hourly earnings, the core CPI and core PCE, have “bottomed out,” he said. They are all moving higher, as well as the internet-based Pricestats inflation gauge. In July, the market was predicting 1% inflation “forever,” Gundlach said; now it is saying that outcome is impossible, and inflation will likely be above 2.5% by April.

As a result, Gundlach said he has liked TIPS since September. In the Flexible fund, he said every Treasury bond was a nominal bond at mid-year; now 100% of its Treasury holdings are TIPS. Over the same time, he said, the Core fund went from having 0% to 30% of its Treasury holdings in TIPS.

Where rates are heading and will the EU will break up

Gundlach offered a number of forecasts across the asset-class spectrum, as well as a prediction for the future of the European Union.

Crude oil could find its way to $60/barrel, he said, and it will be hard for it to drop below $40. From oil’s low January at $26/barrel, it may have a 100% price increase.

Gundlach is “somewhat neutral” on gold over the short term and not as positive on it as he was at year end. He advocated “paring back” gold holdings.

He said he was positive on the dollar from 2011 until mid-2015. Now he is positive again, and said the dollar will “move to higher levels.” The dollar has been a leading indicator of Treasury rates, according to Gundlach. With the dollar at a high level, he advised against buying bonds until the 10-year Treasury reaches 2.30% or 2.35%.

But he said he has “relaxed” the “negative sentiment” he had on interest rates in July. He said he is less likely to forecast higher rates now, but is not predicting an instantaneous reversal of yields to the downside.

“The 10-year yield is higher than its average the past five years,” he said. “This is not my definition of a bull market.”

Has said that the 10-year yield could be 6% in five years, but this is not necessarily negative for bond funds. It depends, he said, on how those funds are positioned and the path that rates take to get to a higher level. Some funds, he said, will do fine reinvesting their coupons at progressively higher rates.

The cash flows from bonds go up when prices go down, he said, whereas when stocks drop in price it is because of unfavorable earnings or economic news, which can lead to dividend cuts.

“There are a lot of reasons to be less negative on Treasury bonds than we were four months ago,” he said.

Virtually all other sectors of the bond market are “on the rich side,” Gundlach said, including mortgages, CMBS, corporate bonds (including junk bonds), leveraged loans, emerging markets and municipals. He said the worst thing to own are 30-year corporate bonds.

If you want to own fixed income, he said to “play it in Treasury bonds.”

At the end of the question-and-answer period, he was asked whether he expects another Brexit event and whether the Eurozone would collapse.

There will be another exit, he said, but he doesn’t know which country it will be.

“There is never one cockroach,” Gundlach said.

Jeff Gundlach has proven time and again that he is not a broken clock.  Ignore at your own risk.

Economy

Overshoot?  Has the post election bond sell off that led to higher interest rates gone too far?

Blinded: Paul Krugman’s election night tweets and blog posts are just the latest example of why political bias & business cycle analysis NEVER  mix.

Welcome to the 21st Century: US Manufacturing is about to get more high tech but still has a ways to go.

Trouble: US consumers are increasingly defaulting on loans made online.  It seems that startups that aimed to revolutionize the banking industry underestimated the risks involved in consumer lending.  Color me shocked.

Commercial

Evolution: Co-working company WeWork which has soared to a $17 billion valuation by leasing space from landlords and then renting it out at a higher price.  However, newcomers in the space look a lot more like hotel operators where landlords pay co-working operators a fee and keep most of the profits, reducing the operators risk profile.

Residential

The Tax Man Cometh: Vancouver, BC seems hellbent on cratering their housing market.  Earlier this year they introduced a 15% surcharge on home purchases by foreign buyers that drove transactions off a cliff.  Apparently, that wasn’t enough because now they are adding a new tax of C$10,000 a year that will be charged to homeowners who let their homes sit vacant.  Those who lie about whether their property is occupied or not will be fined C$10,000 a day, or $7,425, U.S.  In related news, Seattle is looking really, really good to a lot of foreign buyers right about now.   See Also: Why the world’s largest real estate binge is coming to a city near you.  And: As markets waver, the rich are parking money in luxury homes.

Exodus: Data analysis firm CoreLogic found that for every new home buyer coming into California, another three are selling their homes and moving somewhere less expensive as we’ve effectively priced out the middle class through restricting development.

No Privacy: Bathrooms with a view (for both you and potentially your neighbors) are a  hot feature for luxury condo units.

Profiles

Flying High: Drones are evolving from military to business tools and the potential market could be massive.  FYI, the graphics in the linked report from Goldman Sachs are incredible.

Yuge Infographic of the Day

Millennial Home Buyers

WTF

Dirty Money: A Royal Canadian Mint employee (allegedly) smuggled $140k of gold and sumggled it out by shoving it where the sun don’t shine.

Ramen Rampage: An ex con was arrested for domestic battery after striking his live-in boyfriend with a cup of ramen noodles, because Florida.

Mug Shot Competition: Former Oregon football player arrested for theft and a man who was terrifying El Segundo with a turbo charged air horn are locked in a fierce battle for Mugshot of the Week.

Landmark Links – A candid look at the economy, real estate, and other things sometimes related.

Visit us at Landmarkcapitaladvisors.com

Landmark Links November 18th – Hiding in Plain Sight

Landmark Links September 16th – The Carrot and The Stick

Lead Story… Investopedia defines Behavioral Economics as the study of psychology as it relates to the economic decision making processes of individuals and institutions.  IMO, one of the more fascinating applications of behavioral economics deals with the largest investment that most people make in their lifetimes: buying a home.  It’s all a matter of motivation.  What motivates a person to buy a home versus renting?  Much of the preference is based on mobility (renting) vs stability (buying) depending on where a potential buyer or renter sees their life going in the foreseeable future.  However, there is also a very substantial financial motivation that manifests itself in the form of one of the two primary economic forces: fear and greed.

During the housing bubble of the mid aughts, greed was a primary motivating factor in converting renters to owners.  There was a (foolishly) widely adopted mantra back then that housing never fell in value and that acquiring property was a road to riches even if it meant leveraging up to your teeth.  People were buying homes up and calling them “investments” when they were really just speculating on potential future appreciation.  This type of behavior is also driven by a variation of fear: Fear of Missing Out or FOMO for short which was the chosen mantra of the “buy now or be priced out forever” crowd.  Greed in expectation of asset appreciation and FOMO are classic bubble fuel because they tend to make the current price of an asset irrelevant to a prospective buyer.  Once these forces take over the mind of a buyer, the only thing that matters to is the future projected value appreciation.  In the end, trees don’t grow to the sky and we all know how that turned out.

Today, prices are rising again but buyer motivation is quite different than it was a decade ago.  Online real estate website Redfin recently posted the results of a survey of 1,800 home buyers  taken in August that contained this fascinating statistic:

High Rent Driving Tenants to Become Owners

Nearly half of all first-time homebuyers, 45.4 percent, said they were most influenced to get into the housing market because of high rent. In comparison, a year ago 24.7 percent of first-time buyers said they were house hunting because of high rent.

Most-influenced

Among all buyers surveyed, 22 percent said the cost of rent motivated them to get into the market, up substantially from last year’s 12.8 percent but down from 24.4 percent in May.

Overall, 26.3 percent of all buyers said they were most influenced to purchase because of a recent life event, like the birth of a child or a marriage, an identical number to last August.

A whopping 45.4% of first time home buyers said that they decided to purchase a home because rent was too high.  What’s particularly notable is that number is up over 20 percentage points from a year ago.  The second most common answer was a life event.  These are hardly indicative of a bubble or market peak.  Note that those two factors add up to 48.3% for all buyers and 68.8% for first time buyers.  Unfortunately they didn’t publish the whole data set so we can’t see where “Expected Appreciation” or “Investment Return” was on the list.  However it couldn’t have been more than 31.2% for first time buyers based on the numbers provided.  This is a substantial behavioral shift from the bubble era.  I’ve never bought into the “a house is always a great investment” narrative but I don’t buy the “a house is a terrible investment” one either.  The real “investment” value of a house is the hedge that it provides against the rising cost of shelter, primarily rents.  If a buyer purchases a home in a market where future rents are expected to rise substantially (like coastal California) then he or she would typically be willing to pay more because the ownership hedge is more valuable in a market where rents are largely stable because supply can be easily added as needed (Houston, TX for example).  The Redfin findings are encouraging because they indicate that buyers are behaving rationally.  Despite rising prices, buyers today aren’t primarily motivated by FOMO or projected appreciation but rather by an analysis of whether they will be better off financially renting or owning.

Economy

A House Divided: A lack of consensus on inflation at the Federal Reserve means that the central bank is more likely to stand pat than do anything with rates.

All About the Benjamins: A new study confirms that money can’t buy happiness….but confirms that cash often does.

Finally on the Rise: After years of stagnation, median incomes are improving again, and the biggest gains are coming where they are needed most: among the poorest deciles.

Residential

On Point?  Leading VC fund Andreesen Horowitz announced this week that it’s getting into the housing business. To be more precise, the tech investor is backing a new venture called Point which is set up to purchase portion of a homeowner’s equity in a preferred position and participate in the upside at sale.  I want to take some time to digest this one a bit deeper before writing more but I can see several potential fatal issues at first read.

Great Migration: Seattle’s already-hot housing market could see a large influx of Chinese capital now that Vancouver, Canada has told foreign buyers to get lost by imposing a 15% foreign transaction tax, sending sales tumbling.

That Sinking Feeling: San Francisco’s city Building Department is getting hauled in front of the Board of Supervisors to explain how/why they approved Millennium Tower, SF’s incredible sinking luxury condo building.

Profiles

Tough Grader: Want your product to be labeled “Bear Proof”?  It’s going to have to withstand 60 minutes in an enclosure with some of the most difficult reviewers in the world: grizzly bears.

There’s No Place Like Home: The story of how Amazon out-executed both Apple and Google and positioned itself to dominate the technological infrastructure of your home.

Surf’s Up: Surf parks, or giant pools nowhere near the ocean with perfectly formed man-made waves are about to go mainstream.

Chart of the Day

chart3_census_incomepercentile

WTF

Where’s the Beef?  A restaurant patron in Florida was arrested for trashing a Wendy’s after being dissatisfied with her food.  If she expected decent quality food, I don’t know why she was in a Wendy’s in the first place.  In More Fast Food News: Burger King is about to start offering something called Cheetos Chicken Fries.  The race to the bottom for fast food continues unabated.

Apocalypse Now: What happens when millions of people in a city with poor infrastructure ceremonially sacrifice animals before a torrential monsoon downpour?  You get rivers of blood running through the city, which is exactly what is currently happening in Bangladesh.

Frivolous: An Austrian teen is suing her parents over their posting embarrassing childhood photos of her on Facebook, including potty training pictures.  If I couldn’t post embarrassing pictures of my family on social media, I’d quickly lose my will to live.

Landmark Links – A candid look at the economy, real estate, and other things sometimes related.

Visit us at Landmarkcapitaladvisors.com

Landmark Links September 16th – The Carrot and The Stick

Landmark Links August 19th – Ramparts!!!

Lightening_Caddyshack2

Lead Story…  In the all-time classic 1980 comedy Caddyshack, obnoxious condo developer Al Czervik, played by Rodney Dangerfield opines that:

“…golf courses and cemeteries are the biggest wastes of prime real estate.”

He was onto something.  It’s been well documented in the years since the Great Recession that golf courses are, by and large a terrible investment that almost never make money – often losing a lot instead.  In fact over 800 courses have closed over the past decade as a result of no longer being financially viable.  So, imagine my surprise when I saw a feature article in Bloomberg earlier this week about how shuttered golf course clubhouses have developed the strange behavior of spontaneously catching on fire:

The dark clouds rolled in over Phoenix’s Ahwatukee Lakes Golf Course in 2013, when its owner declared that the costs of keeping it open had outstripped what he was collecting in green fees.

Wilson Gee, a California businessman, shuttered the golf course, erected barbed-wire fences, and began looking for a buyer, telling reporters the land would never be a working golf course again. Homeowners, complaining he was turning the course into an eyesore in order to win approval to redevelop it into single-family homes, sued to reopen it. Gee shanked his first attempt to sell it in 2014, when one homebuilder walked away from a deal, but last year found a buyer in a Denver-based developer.

Then one night in February, the dark clouds turned to smoke, and a fire caved in the clubhouse roof.

It’s a local story, defined by conditions peculiar to Ahwatukee, a community of about 80,000 separated from downtown Phoenix by a collection of 2,500-foot peaks known as South Mountain. But the dynamics that bred the deadlock between the struggling golf course’s owner and its aggrieved neighbors are mirrored in communities across the country.

More than 800 golf courses have closed nationwide in the last decade, as operators grapple with declining interest in the sport and a glut of competition. Many of those shuttered courses were built on land proscribed from redevelopment by local zoning codes seeking to preserve open space—or, as with Ahwatukee, by deed restrictions intended to protect homeowners who had paid a premium to live near a golf course.

That leaves some golf course owners with the real estate equivalent of an unplayable lie: They can’t make money running the course, and they can’t recoup their investment by selling it.

“If you open a restaurant in a strip mall and you fail, you close shop and move on,” said Jay Karen, chief executive officer of the National Golf Course Owners Association. But for golf course owners, it’s much harder to pull the plug on a failing business; as courses fall into disuse, they become suburban zombies—not quite dead, yet far from alive.

“Nobody’s tracking what’s happening to the land,” Karen said.

Therein lies the problem: developers went on a golf course building spree back in the 1990s and early 2000s.  Back then, Tiger Woods was bursting onto the scene and golf was seen as a potentially lucrative investment as millions of Baby Boomers approached retirement which would undoubtedly be filled with more time spent on the links than ever.  When master planned communities were built, developers sold course-fronting homes for large premiums.  Fast forward to 2016 and the golf industry is dying a slow death.  Millennials, by and large have neither the time nor the money to play the game, causing a dramatic decline in club revenues and Nike has dropped out of the golf business as a whole as has Dicks Sporting Goods. In fact, participation is down a whopping 20% since 2003.  More from Bloomberg:

In April, fire ripped through the clubhouse at a shuttered western Kentucky golf course that had been the center of a lawsuit, burning through the afternoon until the roof collapsed over smoldering beams. On New Year’s Day, a former volunteer firefighter lit a small fire outside the vacant clubhouse of a closed 9-hole course outside Orlando, then returned three days later to spark a larger blaze, with the help of a can of paint thinner he had found there. And in September 2015, a fire reduced the 10,000-square-foot clubhouse at an abandoned golf course in Bakersfield, Calif., to only a few charred beams.

For John Rhoads, a homeowner in Sparks, Nev., a clubhouse fire at his local course, D’Andrea Golf Club, was both insult and injury. In 2012, its owner had asked members of the local homeowner association to pay an additional $28 a month for course upkeep, Rhoads said. The homeowners demurred, the course was shuttered, and the clubhouse became a magnet for vandals, who posted graffiti on its stucco walls and eventually burned it down. Now Rhoads worries that the owner is making an end run around the homeowner association to convert half of the course into new homes and a winery.

“This used to be one of the nicest golf courses in Reno-Sparks,” he said. Now? “Our property values are already down $25,000 a home.”

So what do you do with a shuttered golf course that has become blighted and attracts vandals and crime?  Developers would love to buy up courses and develop housing on them while dedicating a portion of the site for community agricultural use or park space as the sites are often prime develop-able parcels.  There’s just one problem: homeowners, especially those fronting the course want none of it being that they paid premiums for golf course frontage homes.  The last thing they want is a new neighbor in place of an old fairway.  This leads to an impasse between homeowners and course owners and almost no one is blinking.  Again from Bloomberg (emphasis is mine):

In the face of declining interest and competition driven by oversupply, course owners have gone searching for ways out. Some have donated golf course land to nature trusts and local parks, taking a tax break in return for preserving the open space. Others have inked deals with homebuilders—though those deals are often contingent on winning approval from homeowner associations or local governments.

“I’m hard-pressed to think of many cases where there isn’t a higher or better use than a golf course for the site,” said Jeff Woolson, managing director of the golf and resort group at CBRE Group. “The only clear exception would be Augusta, Ga.”—the hallowed, Bobby Jones-designed course that hosts the Masters tournament each year.

Whatever happens to the shuttered courses, two things are for certain:

  1. We aren’t going to see many golf courses get developed any time soon
  2. The biggest winners will be lawyers who handle the inevitable litigation between desperate course owners and irate homeowners

By the way, does that last quote from Jeff Woolson from CBRE sound a bit familiar?  While I can’t speak to cemeteries, it turns out that Rodney/Al was a visionary after all.

Economy

Rise of the Machines: How China’s factories are increasingly reliant on robots as their workforce shrinks.

Bursting Bubbles: Sorry, John Oliver but subprime auto loans, while likely predatory in some cases, are not the second coming of the U.S. mortgage crisis.

Commercial

They’re Baaaack: After a brief respite earlier this year, Apartment REITs are buying properties again which is a sign of health for the sector.

Residential

Blame Game: The City of Vancouver is blaming foreign buyers for the crazy run-up in it’s housing market and has even gone so far as to enact a 15% tax on foreign purchases in a effort to keep foreign buyers away.  However, a new report by Paul Ashworth of UK based research firm Capital Economics says that foreigners aren’t the primary issue and rather blames irresponsible lending.

Imagine That: Only 13% of households in San Francisco can afford to buy a median priced home.  Ironically, that’s actually substantially better than 9 years ago when only 8% could afford to purchase a house.

Profiles

People of Walmart: Walmart has a major crime problem and it’s driving police crazy.  This story has it all: shootings, stabbings, kidnappings and hostage situations.  However, my favorite episode is the one where police found a meth lab in a large drain pipe under a Walmart parking lot in upstate NY.

Hero: Meet the 102 year old woman who credits her longevity to drinking.

Pants on Fire: Ryan Lochte may be a great athlete but he is also a massive, massive douchebag.

Chart of the Day

WTF

Monkey Business: Video of the day twofer:

  1. Watch a monkey wearing a diaper get in a fight with a Walmart employee in a parking lot.
  2. Watch a baboon in a zoo goes berserk when a little girl taunts it and flings it’s poop at her face.

How to Avoid the Gulag: Shockingly, North Korea is the most efficient country at winning medals at the Rio Olympics.  Let that sink in.

Must Be the Pleats: Meet the Olympic pole vaulter who missed out on a medal because of his…..um pole.  He now claims it was a wardrobe malfunction.  Let me just go on the record to say that I would have handled this ENTIRELY differently had I been in his position.

Ohio = Florida of the Rust Belt: A man from Ohio was arrested for having sex with a red van on Tuesday on the side of a public road.  Sentences like this are what make The Smoking Gun the finest news site in the world: “The victim was parked at the time, cops say.”

Landmark Links – A candid look at the economy, real estate, and other things sometimes related.

Visit us at Landmarkcapitaladvisors.com

Landmark Links August 19th – Ramparts!!!

Landmark Links August 5th – Suicide Pact

Niagra Falls

Lead Story… Vancouver is about to tank it’s residential real estate market after they instituted an astronomical 15% tax on real estate purchases by foreigners.  The worst part may be that existing contracts were not grandfathered in to the new law.  This led to a near-shutdown of the BC land registration system as realtors worked overtime to close before the tax took effect.  Going forward, many of the escrows that didn’t close are likely to fall out as the tax proceeds will exceed released deposits by a substantial amount in some cases.  The impact of such a tax will have massive and chaotic impact as it reverberates through the greater Vancouver market and could become a text book example of the old saying: “be careful what you ask for because you just might get it.” (h/t Darren Fancher) See Also: How Chinese billionaires fueled the epic Vancouver real estate boom.  As a point of reference for just how hot the Vancouver real estate market has been, this picture is worth more than 1,000 words:

Vancouver housing prices

Economy

Aging in Place: Americans over 65 (and increasingly over 75 as well) are staying in the work force well into their retirement years and it’s often about more than just cash flow.  Contra: Aging  US population is hurting both productivity and workforce growth as baby boomers retire.

Bass Ackwards: The best paid CEOs run some of the worst performing companies.

Commercial

Bad Optics: At it’s best, the EB-5 Visa Program, which allows qualified, wealthy foreigners to obtain a green card in exchange for investing $500k or more in a job creating enterprise is a win-win for both investors and developers.  However, the program hasn’t been without controversy and new allegations of developers defrauding foreign investors are not going to help.

Taking Matters Into Their Own Hands: Facebook pledged to build at least 1,500 apartment units for the general public (not including housing for FB employees) in Silicon Valley.  The social media giant is becoming an apartment developer in an attempt to generate support for it’s expansion plans, which call for an adding 6,500 new employees in an already dramatically under-supplied Bay Area market.

Let’s Make a Deal: As new apartments flood the downtown LA market, landlords are increasingly offering rent concessions that were nowhere to be found up to recently.

Residential

Chilled: The Manhattan luxury condo glut has led to an ice-cold land market on the formerly red-hot island.

Water, Water Everywhere…: It’s a seller’s housing market but almost no one is selling primarily because it’s hard to find a replacement house, leading to tight inventory.  See Also: Home ownership is now at a 5-decade low.

Profiles

Crash Proof: How driverless cars could threaten insurers’ earnings.

Lurking in the Shadows: Auction house Sothebys is becoming a player in the shadow banking space.

Podcast of the Day: Malcolm Gladwell’s latest Revisionist History podcast is about the true story behind uncontrolled acceleration accusations leveled against Toyota in 2009 that led to a 10 million car recall and $1 billion fine.  The real story is fascinating – Toyota was a scapegoat – and should be a must-listen for anyone who gets behind the wheel.

Chart of the Day

WTF

Roaming Charges: Japanese Olympic gymnast Kohei Uchimura, the defending gold medalist in the men’s all-around competition got hit with a $5,000 phone bill (which his carrier later agreed to reduce substantially) due to the fact that he: 1) Apparently has a Pokemon Go addiction and 2) Didn’t bother to disable the roaming feature on his cell phone while in Brazil. To make matters worse, he had a 0% chance of actually capturing a Pokemon as the game has not yet been released in Brazil.  That’s a painful hit to the wallet but this also feels like a great endorsement opportunity.

Getting Kids Involved in the Political Process: Mayor Anthony Silva of Stockton, CA was recently arrested and charged with providing alcohol to minors at a youth camp that he runs because, well, Stockton.

You Gonna Smoke That? A man from Orlando Florida was recently arrested when police mistook his Krispy Kreme doughnut for meth.  There’s a great cops and doughnuts joke in there somewhere (h/t Chris Gomez-Ortigoza).

Landmark Links – A candid look at the economy, real estate, and other things sometimes related.

Visit us at Landmarkcapitaladvisors.com

Landmark Links August 5th – Suicide Pact

Landmark Links June 28th – Tank Commander

Byron-Scott-Driving-The-Lakers-Tank

Lead Story…  We spend a lot of time talking about the San Francisco housing markets and rightfully so: it’s a microcosm of all that is wrong with restrictive zoning in closed access US cities and the poster child for NIMBY obstructionism.  As such, San Francisco has managed to overshadow another North American market that is incredibly expensive and getting worse: Vancouver, BC  Year-over year, Vancouver’s benchmark housing index is up 30% to just under $900k while single family detached house prices increased a whopping 40% to $1.374MM (in US dollars) in a city where median household income is around $67k in US dollars – San Francisco is in the $82k range.  So how does an MSA with such a low median household income (one of the lowest of major Canadian cities) end up with a median home price that is among the highest? 1) Massive levels of housing demand from wealthy foreign investors, especially from China; and 2) Highly restrictive zoning that makes it difficult to add enough housing units to satisfy  that demand.  One critical distinction between SF and Vancouver is that much of Vancouver’s foreign purchases appear to be for investment purposes only while SF real estate has clearly benefited from the tech boom and it’s highly compensated workforce.  This, combined with the inability to build enough new units for residents, is leaving Vancouver with empty units that transact for nosebleed prices.  The increase in value was so extreme last year that at least one mathematician estimated that the rising land value of single family homes accounted for more than the entire employment income in the City of Vancouver and now over 90% of detached houses there are worth over $1MM.

Foreign buyers have come under increasing scrutiny of late for the impact that they are having on the worlds most expensive real estate markets.  Some of it is justified.  For example, the US Treasury department now requires that title insurance companies report the people behind shell companies on all-cash purchases over a certain level in NY and Miami in order to curtail money laundering.  Others like Great Britain, which increased the stamp duty on second home purchases by 3% and raised taxes on more expensive homes in an effort to drive down demand.  Few places though, have considered responding as harshly as Vancouver, which is considering a tax on vacant homes.    From the South China Morning Post:

Vancouver’s mayor Gregor Robertson says he is considering the introduction of a tax on empty homes, amid a roiling debate in the city about the role of Chinese money and offshore investors in North America’s most unaffordable real estate market.

In an interview with Bloomberg TV on Tuesday, Robertson said he was “looking at new regulation and a carrot-and-stick approach to making sure that houses aren’t empty in Vancouver,” including a tax on vacant homes. “If you’re not using your property – either living in it or renting it out – then you have to pay more tax. Because effectively it’s a business holding, and should be taxed accordingly.”

There is a very substantial difference between adding to transaction costs or requiring ownership disclosures, as the US and Britain are doing and what Vancouver’s mayor proposed here.  The steps taken by the US and Britain either increase transaction costs or regulatory paperwork in an effort to slow demand from a certain buying segment.  The Vancouver proposal takes a very different approach: it would actually increase the holding cost of foreign-owned (but unoccupied) real estate by imposing a different tax structure.  This isn’t limited to the purchase transaction, instead its a recurring annual cost.  More from the South China Morning Post:

A tax targeting vacant properties was proposed by dozens of economists in January.The BC Housing Affordability Fund, which has been pitched to both the City and British Columbia provincial government, would impose a 1.5 per cent annual tax (based on home price) on owners who either left homes vacant or had “limited economic or social ties to Canada”.

BCHAF proponent Tom Davidoff, an economist at the University of British Columbia, said it was unclear if Robertson’s remarks on Tuesday referred to his group’s proposal. “We talked to the city and they gave us a good listen,” he said.

“I would hope that any vacancy tax would cover the bigger issue here which is not paying taxes here and not being a landlord [either],” said Davidoff, whose group’s proposal would also tax people who under-utilised properties as a “pied-a-terre”, and those whose primary breadwinner paid little or no income tax in Canada – so-called “astronaut families”.

This strikes me as the quickest way to cause an exodus of foreign capital from a given real estate market because, unlike the US and British solutions, it would not just apply to new purchases.  It is also rife with the potential for unintended consequences.  For example, who is to say if a property is under-utilized?  Who actually gets to make that distinction and is there a hard and fast rule that could be applied.  If you were a foreign (or domestic for that matter) investor or homeowner who had a house there and you knew that costs were about to go up a proposed 1.5% a year based on home price (not unsubstantial on a million dollar home) would you hang around to see how it was implemented?  This type of tax could send foreign investors rushing towards the exit before a glut of supply hits the market as investors seek friendlier locales in which to invest.  At least it appears as if cooler heads are prevailing at the provincial and national level.  Again from the South China Morning Post:

Both Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and BC Premier Christy Clark have said they worry that taking steps to curtail foreign ownership in Vancouver could imperil the equity of existing owners.

I hope that Prime Minister Trudeau and Premier Clark’s logic prevails as this would be an incredibly dumb way to tank a real estate market and the collateral economic damage done to existing homeowners would be all too real.  In all of the talk about how to bring Vancover’s prices under control, it seems as if no one (or at least very few people) are proposing a real solution: relaxing restrictive zoning codes so that more units could be built to meet demand.  Ultimately, that’s the only way to avoid what some are now calling a bubble.  Rather, we get more of the same convoluted restrictions, subsidies and taxes that don’t solve the actual problem and often do more harm than good.  The Vancouver mayor’s proposal is a tanking strategy that would make even the shittiest NBA team blush. Let’s that American cities with a large number of foreign investors don’t follow the example.

Economy

Tailwind: Per Calculated Risk, the largest population cohorts in the US are now 20-24 and 25-29 which is positive for the economy in general and housing in particular as young people begin to form households.

Brexit Breakdown: By now you probably know that UK residents voted to leave the EU, sending stock prices down the toilet around the globe and spurring demand for safe haven assets like treasuries and gold.  The betting markets got this one dead wrong as did pollsters and most government officials.  Despite the crazy market response, nothing will really change from a trade standpoint in the near-term and there is already a movement underway to try to reverse the referendum.  Either way, nothing is going to happen until this fall when British PM David Cameron resigns.  Here’s a quick roundup of what people far more knowledgeable than I are saying:

Tyler Cowen on why the Brexit happened and what it means.

George Soros on the future of Europe and why it might have more issues than Britain.

Gabriel Roth on why the actual Brexit might not ever actually happen

The BBC on the high likelihood of another Scottish independence vote as a result of the Brexit outcome.

See Also: S&P and Fitch downgrade UK credit rating.

Best House on a Bad Block: The US economy looks likely to weather the Brexit storm even if it puts the Fed on hold for a while longer.

Commercial

 

Winner, Winner, Chicken Dinner: How US REITs could benefit from the Brexit.

Residential

Scraping the Bottom: Brexit panic has pushed interest rates to record lows and mortgage rates are following and they could be headed even lower.

Profiles

Trade of the Century: The story of how George Soros’ Quantum Fund made trade of the century by breaking the British pound is especially fascinating today in light of recent world events.

Green Monsters: Avocado theft is on the rise.

Please Make it Stop: Enough with the stupid Millennial surveys already.

Chart of the Day

The US Demographic Tailwind

Population: Largest 5-Year Cohorts by Year
Largest
Cohorts
2010 2015 2020 2030
1 45 to 49 years 20 to 24 years 25 to 29 years 35 to 39 years
2 50 to 54 years 25 to 29 years 30 to 34 years 40 to 44 years
3 15 to 19 years 50 to 54 years 35 to 39 years 30 to 34 years
4 20 to 24 years 55 to 59 years Under 5 years 25 to 29 years
5 25 to 29 years 30 to 34 years 55 to 59 years 5 to 9 years
6 40 to 44 years 15 to 19 years 20 to 24 years 10 to 14 years
7 10 to 14 years 45 to 49 years 5 to 9 years Under 5 years
8 5 to 9 years 10 to 14 years 60 to 64 years 15 to 19 years
9 Under 5 years 5 to 9 years 15 to 19 years 20 to 24 years
10 35 to 39 years 35 to 39 years 10 to 14 years 45 to 49 years
11 30 to 34 years 40 to 44 years 50 to 54 years 50 to 54 years

Source: Calculated Risk

WTF

Video of the Day / Attempted Darwin Award:  It’s exceedingly rare that an attempted Darwin Award gets caught on video.  This past weekend, two morons attempted to surf a 20 + foot swell at The Wedge in Newport Beach on a rental jet ski despite being warned repeatedly by lifeguards to stay away.  It went horribly wrong with the jet ski ending up on top of the Newport Jetty before nearly sinking while getting swept out to sea as Newport’s lifeguards and local Wedge veterans saved the riders from their own epic stupidity.  No word on whether or not they got their deposit back.  Looks like it’s time to add some more chlorine to the gene pool.

Can You Spot the Irony? A man named Ronald McDonald was shot outside a Sonic in New York.

I’d Rather Eat My Shoe: Burger King recently introduced something called Mac N’ Cheetos.  The race to the bottom for the American fast food industry continues with no end in sight.

Landmark Links – A candid look at the economy, real estate, and other things sometimes related.

Visit us at Landmarkcapitaladvisors.com

Landmark Links June 28th – Tank Commander