Landmark Links October 21 – Dense Hypocrisy

wolf_wall_street3

Lead Story… There is little that I enjoy more than reading (or writing) about the hypocrisy of self-important celebrities.  However, one of my primary rules for writing this blog is to avoid politics – unless it’s land use politics (or water politics).  As such, I haven’t had the opportunity to write much about celebrity hypocrisy, despite frequent gnawing temptation to do so.  Today’s blog will be different.

At this point in his career, Leonardo DiCaprio is almost as well known for his environmental activism as he is for his acting, or, for that matter the number of supermodels that he’s slept with.  This is despite the fact that his anti-fossil fuel stance is frequently juxtaposed against his high-rolling lifestyle of flying around the world on carbon-spewing private jets and spending his vacations on yachts rented or borrowed from oil sheikhs, all of which is evidenced by his massive carbon footprint.    However, the above examples may not even be his most egregious examples of hypocrisy since they only deal with his individual actions and lifestyle.  His views on land use politics are far more disturbing and far more destructive from an environmental prospective.

So, now we come to the land use part of this story.  It’s not a controversial notion that the best thing that a city can do to cut down on pollution is build more density in it’s core as higher density in urban centers leads to less automobile use, which leads to less carbon emissions.  If residents are located closer together, there is less need to transport people and goods over further distances.  Therefore energy use is reduced, as well as water usage for that matter since higher density typically means less large lawns to water.  This is roughly as objectionable as someone making an argument that water is wet or that orange juice tastes like oranges.  So, imagine my surprise (end sarcasm here) when I recently read a story on Curbed LA about how self-styled environmental crusader Leonard DiCaprio (among other celebrity “activists”) had signed onto an anti-development campaign known as the Neighborhood Integrity Initiative demanding the following:  From Curbed LA  (emphasis mine):

(1) Direct officials to halt amendment of the City’s General Plan in small bits and pieces for individual real estate developer projects, and

(2) Require the City Planning Commission to systematically review and update the City’s community plans and make all zoning code provisions and projects consistent with the City’s General Plan, and

(3) Place City employees directly in charge of preparation of environmental review of major development projects, and

(4) For a limited time, impose a construction moratorium for projects approved by the City that increased some types of density until officials can complete review and update of community plans or 24 months, whichever occurs first.

This list of demands was presented to Mayor Eric Garcetti.  The group claims that they have enough signatures to get their measure on the ballot should Garcetti not submit to their demands.  This is NIMBYism, plain and simple.  There is just no other way to describe it  From Curbed LA (emphasis mine):

So, quite literally, the single best thing that a city can do for the planet is locate destinations—houses, jobs, grocery stores, schools—closer together so its residents expend less time, less money, and fewer fossil fuels traveling among them.

That’s how LA needs to think about density—as a long-term solution for climate change that will also deliver short-term social and economic benefits.

The problem with anti-density campaigns is that their boosters aren’t thinking about our city in a way that looks beyond what they see on their own block today.

Santa Monica’s anti-density measure, LV, is the most troubling, as it would require a citywide vote to approve any new structure over 32 feet. This would make it politically (and economically) difficult to erect buildings more than two stories tall in a prohibitively expensive city that already has limited room to grow, pushing workers farther and farther away from their jobs.

Again, as stated previously, the fact that increasing density in urban cores is good for the environment is not particularly controversial, nor is it an issue opposed by those on either the right or the left….until it happens near when they live.  In this case, it’s a matter of wealthy hypocrites who claim to be environmentalists trying to stop development because it happens to inconvenience their lifestyle a bit, despite the fact that the development would have a substantial positive impact on the environment that they claim to care so much about.  Again, from Curbed LA (emphasis mine):

Restricting building height and planning for cars goes against everything that environmental leaders and sustainability experts have been saying for decades: If you’re erecting a multi-use structure in a dense, transit-accessible neighborhood with centralized freight delivery systems, the environmental impact of that structure is lessened significantly over time.

Building a two-story building surrounded by a city-mandated parking lot on an extra wide street is not the worst thing you could do for the planet. The worst thing you could do for the planet is codify this kind of development into the land use and planning policies of your city to make building anything else impossible.

That’s why many cities and states are incentivizing dense, transit-accessible development as part of a larger climate-friendly mandate to not only decrease emissions, but also improve public health, clean the air, and slash energy costs.

My broader point here is that you can’t have it both ways.  This isn’t an issue where there is a credible case that increasing density in urban cores isn’t better for the environment than doing the opposite: incentivizing sprawl by making it impossible to build in urban areas.  You can’t be an environmental advocate only when it suits your personal interests and expect not to get called out on your hypocrisy, especially when you stake out as hard-line of a position as DiCaprio has.

Economy

Watching the Horizon: According to Bloomberg, odds are that the next financial crisis will come from depressed lenders, shadow banks or China.

Conscientious Uncoupling: How a massive surge in divorce rates in couples over 50 years old is forcing people to work longer and putting retirements at risk.

Commercial

Rise of the Machines: Industrial robots are driving some major changes in both warehouse design and workforce composition.

Residential

History Lesson: The New York Times published a fairly balanced history of the story behind the prop 13 tax revolt and it’s consequences.

Bad Rap: Luxury condos and apartments get a bad rap when it comes to the increasing cost of housing when restrictive zoning is more often the real culprit.

The Missing Middle: By continuing to focus primarily on housing prices in San Francisco and NY, the media is missing a bigger story – rentals are becoming un-affordable nation-wide for middle class families.

Profiles

What’s the Story?  HGTV has achieved something incredible: a bunch of hit shows with no serialized narrative drama that is the hallmark of the modern successful series.

Video Of the Day: Meet Rox Zee, the Boise State football team’s kickoff tee fetching Labrador Retriever.  In related news, I think that I just became a Boise State fan.

Troll So Hard: Twitter’s infamous army of anonymous trolls played a roll in Salesforce passing on offering to acquire the troubled social media platform.

Farm to Cart: Target is experimenting with so-called vertical farms where produce is grown in-store.

Chart of the Day

WTF

Political Metaphor: A Hillary Clinton tour bus was busted dumping human waste down a storm drain in an Atlanta suburb, resulting in a hazmat team getting dispatched to the site.  If you’ve ever seen National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation, you are aware that this can end really, really terribly.  On a personal note, I can’t wait for this election season to end.

Revealing Protest: Porn actors (I never understood why they are all called stars) are picketing on the streets in Hollywood to protest a ballot proposition which would impose mandatory condom use for any adult video filmed in the state.  Los Angeles passed a similar law in 2012 that decimated the adult industry, causing permits to plunge from 480 in the year it was passed to just 25 last year.

Pack a Day: Meet Azalea, the chain smoking chimp who has become the star of North Korea’s new national zoo in Pyongyang.

Landmark Links – A candid look at the economy, real estate, and other things sometimes related.

Visit us at Landmarkcapitaladvisors.com

Landmark Links October 21 – Dense Hypocrisy

Landmark Links July 1st – East Coast Edition

909er

Happy 4th of July!  First off, Jason Pierre-Paul of my beloved Giants and his disturbingly-mangled hand has a public service announcement for you: don’t light fireworks off in your hands as doing so can leave you disfigured and also cost you tens of millions of dollars in the NFL free agent market.  To paraphrase Apu from the Simpsons: “Celebrate the independence of your nation by blowing up a small part of it….just make sure that it doesn’t include your hand.”

Lead Story… The Panama Canal will be opening up a new lane for larger ships in the coming weeks.  One of the economic winners will be owners of industrial buildings in a quaint area of South Carolina 200 miles from the sea where a construction boom is underway to accommodate goods coming into the Port of Charleston, which is currently undergoing dredging that will make it the deepest harbor on the east coast.  Consider it the new Inland Empire of the South.  From the Wall Street Journal:

In the past few years, the rolling hills and farmland surrounding Greenville and Spartanburg have given way to massive warehouses and industrial parks. Restaurants in Greenville, S.C.’s formerly neglected downtown cater to corporate managers and engineers from Germany and Japan. Trucks clog the two main interstates, carrying engine parts and finished goods to and from the region’s growing number of manufacturing plants.

More development is on the way: over six million square feet of warehouse space is under construction in the Greenville-Spartanburg region, a scale typically seen in major cities like Philadelphia and St. Louis, according to CBRE Inc., a real-estate brokerage.

The construction frenzy is being fueled by developments at the Panama Canal, nearly 2,000 miles away. The new, wider ship channel will allow bigger ships to pass through, lowering the cost of bringing Asian-made goods directly to the East Coast.

Industrial boom

Sound familiar?  It should if you’eve ever spent time in the former cow pastures west of I-15 in San Bernardino and Riverside Counties that now have millions of square feet of class-A warehouses that serve as a massive distribution hub for the ports of LA and Long Beach.  Some are arguing that the canal widening will allow Asian exporters to hedge against the labor issues that have boiled over in LA and Long Beach in recent years, grinding commerce to a halt even at the expense of a few extra shipping days to get to market.  The counter argument is that days to market will still rule and there isn’t likely to be much of any drop off in LA and Long Beach.  Either way, the net volume of traffic going to east coast ports is likely going up to some extent and that is what industrial developers are anticipating.  This could potentially be a massive economic stimulus for an area that was formerly a textile hub and lately had best been know for automotive manufacturing. More from the Journal:

The expanded Panama Canal “is going to drive industry and create even more businesses there,” said Joel Sutherland, director of the Supply Chain Management Institute at the University of San Diego. “Having a regular flow of containers…will attract major manufacturing, then their suppliers, then their suppliers’ suppliers, and ultimately more people.”

From the Port of Charleston—which is dredging its harbor to be the deepest on the East Coast—container cargo makes the quick trip by rail to a freight hub in Greer, S.C., known as the Upstate’s “inland port.”

Trucks pick up those containers of component parts and retail goods bound for nearby factories and distribution centers. And from there, truckers can reach Atlanta or Charlotte, N.C., in two or three hours, and most of the rest of the Eastern U.S. within a day’s drive.

“The Panama Canal is not even completed, the port dredging has not been completed, but we’re already attracting major distribution and manufacturing companies,” said Trey Pennington, an industrial real-estate broker with CBRE in Greenville. “The Panama Canal will fundamentally change the market dynamics of South Carolina in the coming years.”

It’s also a given that more economic growth and well-paying jobs will lead to more residential and retail development which leads to…..you guessed it – NIMBYs who, as always are coming out of the woodwork to protest anything new being built:

In downtown Greenville, higher-end residential and retail development—a Brooks Brothers clothing shop opened on Main Street in 2013—is forcing out some longtime residents. Across Greenville and Spartanburg counties, residents say traffic congestion has never been worse.

The Upstate’s main roads are lined with razed fields where warehouse structures rise in various states of construction. Conservationists say the region’s natural landscape in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains—which draws outdoor enthusiasts and an especially large number of professional and amateur cyclists—is under threat as housing and industrial construction push further out from the cities and transportation corridors.

“The Upstate needs to balance this development with protecting valuable green spaces and water quality,” said Andrea Cooper, director of Upstate Forever, an environmental advocacy group.

In a strange way, I’m relieved to see that the “If You Build It They Will Whine (and most likely sue you)” crowd doesn’t confine itself to coastal California.  If the Panama Canal expansion ends up resulting in a 10% – 20% increase in goods going through Charleston as some predict, the Upstate could be in for a prolonged economic boom that will likely keep the anti-growth NIMBY crowd busy for the foreseeable future.  If that scenario does play out, look for the region to become a prime growth corridor with all of the positives (and yes, some negatives) that go with economic expansion.  South Carolina may be getting it’s own version of the 909 so be on the lookout for the flat brimmed hats, barbed wire tattoos and lifted pickup trucks.

Economy

Stick a Fork in It: The futures markets are now saying that the Fed won’t raise interest rates until 2018 post-Brexit.  See Also: Government bonds from developed economies have been this year’s jackpot investment.

News Flash: It’s really, really expensive to raise a child in the US.  Per the US department of agriculture, the average cost to raise a child born in 2013 from birth to 18-years old is $245,340, ranging from $176,550 for low-income families to $407,820 for high-income families.   This only covers a kid to age 18 so it DOESN’T include college.  It’s truly a wonder that young people are delaying household formation coming out of the Great Recession…..

Commercial

Scarcity: 1031 exchange buyers are having a difficult time finding enough deals to trade into, leading them into unfamiliar markets and product types and helping to bid up already-high commercial real estate prices.

Residential

Unintended Consequences: There has been no group of people more wrong over the past 7 years than the “interest rates have nowhere to go but up” crowd.  The Brexit is just the latest example of why this line of thinking has been incorrect. There is also a credible argument that Brexit could set off a chain of events that would result in mortgage rates in the 2s.  I’m not saying that it will happen or even that it’s likely but the possibility shouldn’t be ignored based on the deflationary forces that we are seeing in the world economy.

Not in the Ballpark: US housing supply continues to lag far behind demand just as it has been doing since 2009.

Unsustainable: Inflation-adjusted rents rose 64% from 1960-2014 while real household incomes increased only 18%, resulting in the share of cost-burdened renters nationwide exploding from 24% in 1960 to 49% in 2014.  If you want to know why so many people struggle to save for a down payment, this is a good place to start:

Profiles

Hero: Meet the world’s first robot lawyer, a free online chatbot who has managed to overturn 160,000 parking tickets in London and New York, saving users nearly $3.9MM in fines since it was launched 21 months ago.  The 19 year old British coder who invented this should win a Nobel Prize.

Predictable: There is one industry that is about to make a fortune on the Brexit regardless of what happens with regards to markets and the economy: lawyers.

Stressed: The Federal Reserve’s annual bank stress tests have spawned a multibillion-dollar industry where banks hire consultants to manage other consultants  in order to help them pass, fueling a never-ending feedback loop of red tape and bureaucracy.

Chart of the Day.

Supply and Demand for Housing

Supply = Blue, Demand = Gold

Difference Between Housing Supply and Demand

WTF

Breast in the World: Just in time for July 4th, the Journal of Female Health Sciences recently released a new study that found the US rules the world in a very important category: American women have the world’s largest boobs.  The study excluded surgical enhancements, which of course naturally meant that only two women in Orange County – which qualifies as a very different type of Silicon Valley – were eligible to participate.  Yes, this is blatant click-bait but I’m going to milk it for all it’s worth as I feel it’s my duty to augment your base of knowledge by keeping you abreast of important news.

Video of the Day: In a development that will likely alter the path of human history, some genius figured out that beer pong is more fun and challenging if the cups are placed on top of a Roomba vacuum cleaner which is then placed on top of the beer pong table.  Bring a Roomba to your 4th of July BBQ and you will be the most popular person there.  Guaranteed.

Vegan News Roundup: Vegans are now forcing their bat-shit-crazy religion on their dogs (which, by the way are carnivores) because vegans are mostly insane.  Side note: this definitely qualifies as animal abuse.

Landmark Links – A candid look at the economy, real estate, and other things sometimes related.

Visit us at Landmarkcapitaladvisors.com

Landmark Links July 1st – East Coast Edition

Landmark Links June 24th – Follow the Money

hqdefault

Lead Story…. Urban Dictionary (my go to source for all things slang) defines a tiger mom as:

“A mother who is overly strict with her child in order to foster an academically competitive spirit.  This form of upbringing is intended to direct a child towards financially successful careers at the potential risk of feeling emotionally unfulfilled and/or socially inept.”

Just my opinion, but it sounds like a rather terrible way to grow up.  I’ve always assumed that children who were raised in such an environment would be the ones most likely to end up driving the porcelain bus in a dorm bathroom once they go to college and finally obtained their first taste of freedom from overbearing parents.  However, there is a relatively new trend where tiger moms, typically from China are following their children to college to ensure that their offspring’s hard work doesn’t get flushed down the drain in a torrent of booze and late night parties. From The Economist (h/t Jeff Condon):

EVERYONE knows that Chinese students are flooding American campuses. Less widely known is that their mothers are coming, too. Last year 394,669 pupils from China were studying at American universities, secondary and primary schools, the largest contingent of all international students. Increasingly their parents are moving in with them, buying local properties or investing at least $500,000 in businesses to try to qualify for a green card.

The tiger mums usually come to America alone, leaving their husbands behind. “When I wasn’t here, my son would survive on instant noodles and energy drinks for several days without eating fruit or vegetables,” says Wenxue Hu, mother of a masters student studying applied mathematics at the University of Pennsylvania. She gave up her job as a corporate finance director in Shenzhen to cook for him in Philadelphia. Through a local church she met other Chinese tiger mums, most of whom entered with a tourist visa that allows them to stay up to six months each time. New Haven, Connecticut now boasts a “Yale Chinese grandparents’ village”, with 15 residents. The old folk live under the same roof as their children, mostly PhD and post-doctoral students at Yale who are too busy to take care of their own offspring.

On one hand, I suppose this keeps kids more focused on school helps to make good on the massive investment the college represents.  On the other, college is supposed to be the time when young people strike out on their own, make mistakes and learn from them – rather than continuing to live under the thumb of their mothers.  As you can probably imagine, this is having a massive impact on housing markets in markets around top universities.  Again, from The Economist (highlights mine):

Last year China became the largest source of foreign property investment in America, pouring in $28.6 billion. Roughly 70% of inquiries from the Chinese indicated that education was the chief motive, says Matthew Moore, president of the American division of http://www.juwai.com, a Chinese international-property website. In Chicago estate agents anticipate more Chinese parents buying expensive condominiums. In Irvine, California, about 70-80% of buyers of new-builds are Chinese parents whose children attend, or plan to attend, nearby colleges, says Peggy Fong Chen, the CEO of ReMax Omega Irvine. Other college towns such as Los Angeles, Seattle, Boston and Dallas, see a similar trend.

The Irvine statistic surprised me a bit.  Irvine has long been a hot spot for Chinese buyers and much of that demand has been driven by it’s phenomenal schools.  However, I’d always assumed that the demand was driven more by it’s public schools than surrounding colleges such as UC Irvine.  Then again, UCI’s student body is 46.2% Asian and 11.7% international with a student body of around 24,500 undergrads and 5,500 graduates so it’s not hard to see how this could drive demand for housing if there are 3,500 foreign students at UCI and even a small percentage have parents who move with them and buy a home. According to The Economist, buying a house can make good financial sense, as well as  cultural sense for a Chinese investor/parent:

For the rising middle class in China, parking their wealth overseas also makes good business sense. The near-bubble in housing prices at home and the depreciation of the yuan have made them nervous, so diversification becomes pressing. As property prices shoot up in some college towns, more Chinese buyers are drawn in, says Susan Wachter, a real-estate professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Ownership, rather than renting, becomes more attractive, because their children can rent extra bedrooms to classmates to cover utility and tax bills, while also being able to benefit from future price rises.  Some tiger mums also try to help their children get married by making the down-payment or even meeting the full cost. In Chinese culture, owning a property gives a sense of security and helps to attract a spouse.

Coming out of the Great Recession, there has been no better housing bet than going where the Chinese investors want to be.  If their buying demand is really being dictated by higher education, I would imagine that this is a trend that could continue for quite a while, especially given the ever-rising cost of college at top schools and the growing number of newly-wealthy people in China that can afford it.

Economy

Say What? Every now and then, Jose Canseco emerges from his steroid-induced coma, pulls a needle out of his butt and goes on Twitter to impart his wisdom of all things finance – which I try to cover here whenever possible.  This week our roid-addled friend opined on the Brexit vote and the it was everything that you would expect financial advice from Jose Canseco to be. Update: UK citizens declined Jose’s advice and voted to leave the EU.  Market chaos this morning and Jose declined offers to go on air with both Bloomberg and Yahoo finance because they wouldn’t pay him (I’m not making this up. You NEED to follow him on Twitter). 

The Whole Story: We often hear about how the top 1% of Americans is doing dramatically better than everyone else.  While that is true it misses a larger point: the upper middle class (defined as any household earning $100,000 to $350,000 for a family of three) is growing rapidly as well.  According to a new study from the Urban Institute:

“The size of the upper middle class grew from 12.9 percent of the population in 1979 to 29.4 percent in 2014. In terms of shares of total income, the middle class controlled a bit more than 46 percent of all incomes in 1979, while the upper middle class and rich controlled 30 percent. By 2014, the rich and upper middle class controlled 63 percent of all incomes, while the middle class share had shrunk to 26 percent.”

This goes a long way towards explaining why the luxury segment of the housing market has done so much better than lower segments in recent years.  If you don’t have time to read the full report, the Wall Street Journal put together an excellent summary.

70 is the New 65: According to PIMCO, demographics support rates staying lower for longer.  See Also: The yield curve is nearing its cycle low.

Commercial

Sea Change: Someday we are going to talk about department stores the way that our parents talk about switch board operators.  They are being eaten alive by internet retailers.  Great news for class-A distribution warehouse space.  Not so great news for retail.  I could go on but this chart from Bloomberg tells the story better than I can:

Residential

Non-Starter: When is a starter home not a starter home?  When no one can afford it.  Yes, inventory is extremely low nationwide but in some markets buyers are dropping at a quicker pace than inventory is, leading to softening prices.  From Trulia:

One might think that falling starter home inventory over the past year would cause starter home prices to rise, and for the most part, that’s what has happened in most markets. In places like Portland, Dallas, and Colorado Springs, Colo., large decreases in starter home inventory has led to double-digit increases in starter home prices. However, price movements aren’t just determined by changes in supply (inventory) – they’re also affected by the number of home buyers actively bidding on homes. In fact, in 20 of the 74 markets where starter inventory has dropped, demand has fallen at faster pace and so prices have fallen.

For example, starter home inventory has fallen by about 20% of the past year in both Columbia, S.C., and Charleston, S.C., but starter home prices have actually fallen in these markets by 0.8% and 5%, respectively. And these two cities aren’t outliers – 18 others large metros that have experienced a drop in inventory have also seen price drops, including New York, Kansas City, and Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pa.

Don’t get too excited though if you’re a prospective homebuyer.  Trulia found that affordability is still getting worse in many of the hottest markets:

Starter homes continue to experience the largest drops in inventory over the past year, followed closely by trade-up homes. While starter home buyers in California have seen some of the largest decreases in affordability, those in central Florida are non-California metros in the West are starting to feel their pain. But a fall in inventory for trade-up and premium homes is occurring at a time when demand for those homes is rising, so those buyers are feeling a tighter pinch than starter home buyers in markets where demand has fallen enough to keep prices from rising.

 

Profiles

Unintended Consequences: Rule 34 states that: “If it exists, there is porn of it – no exceptions.”  As skeevy and disturbing as that sounds, it’s been scientifically proven to be pretty much true.  There is a corollary to Rule 34 that if you provide free wifi, it will be used to watch porn.  This should be obvious by 2016 unless you are incredibly naive, which the City of NY apparently is.  The city announced an initiative earlier this year to convert former payphones in Times Square to wifi-enabled screens to provide free internet to citizens.  But well-meaning project went horribly wrong when homeless men figured out that they could use the ill-conceived devices to stream porn in public.  For those of you unaware of the history of Times Square, it used to be a haven for peep shows and seedy adult video stores until it was cleaned up back in the 90s, thanks mainly to then-mayor Rudy Giuliani.  From the NY Post (for whom this story was tailor-made):

“I used to come here in the ’70s, and I remember thinking Times Square was as skeezy as you could get, but I was wrong,” said former New Yorker Richard Herzberg, 61, who now lives in Dallas, Texas.

“This is as skeezy as Times Square could get. I mean, in the old days there was plenty of porn, but you could only see it behind closed doors. So at least there was that level of modesty.”

To their credit the city responded by installing filters (which will likely be compromised any day now).  As you can imagine the homeless guys weren’t too happy about losing access to their free porn:

“I was watching porn on one of them things on, like, Saturday,” said a homeless man who identified himself as Hakeem, 44.

“Then on, like, Monday or Tuesday, all of a sudden I couldn’t,” he added.

“Once word got around, it stopped. It sucks, man. It was great.”

Looks like the NYC homeless population will have to find their porn elsewhere for the time being.

Mad Money, Questionable Ethics: Multiple studies have shown that Jim Cramer’s stock picks basically suck and don’t come close to beating the S&P – while taking substantially more risk, yet he continues to use his CNBC show as an infomercial to promote his $59.95/month stock picking service.

Of Buggy Whips and Floppy Disks: Apple is indicating that headphone jacks are on the way out.

Chart of the Day

Growth of Upper Middle Class

 

WTF

I Wonder What He Had For Lunch: A Swedish soccer player was ejected from a game recently for ripping a fart.  I know that soccer players are notorious for being drama queens but this feud between the ref and player over whether it was intentional or not is next level (h/t Tom Farrell):

The referee explained himself. “I perceived it as deliberate provocation,” Kako said, adding that he’d once given a player a yellow for peeing by the field as well. “He did it on purpose and it was inappropriate. Therefore, he received a yellow card.”

Ljungkvist then re-litigated the matter to Aftonbladet, which definitely is a newspaper. “To provoke anyone with a fart is not particularly smart or normal,” he said. “It’s nonsense – I just broke wind and got a red card. I spoke to the referee afterwards, I was annoyed, but there were no bad words. I just said he was a buffoon.”

Follow Friday: Every now and then I stumble across a must-follow Instagram or Twitter account.  City Subway Creatures (@subwaycreatures), an account that posts pictures of the odd folks who ride the NYC subway system is one such account.  Follow them today.  You won’t regret it unless you don’t have a sense of humor or are easily offended – then don’t both.

Indecent Exposure: Meet the inmate who stripped naked and ran into a court room in the middle of a trial to yell: “Court is back in session“!  He is now facing additional charges.

Special Delivery: Meet the Wyoming man who was arrested for going door-to-door selling cocaine and meth. When asked for comment, he replied “it wasn’t going to sell itself.”

Landmark Links – A candid look at the economy, real estate, and other things sometimes related.

Visit us at Landmarkcapitaladvisors.com

Landmark Links June 24th – Follow the Money